2011
Participating Institutions
 
 
451. Charles Dahlgreen (1864 - 1955) Chicago native Charles W. Dahlgreen was born on September 8, 1864.  After working in commercial art as a painter of banners and emblems and trying his hand at prospecting in the Klondike, Dahlgreen decided at age forty to study art seriously and to become a painter.  Dahlgreen enrolled at the Art Institute of Chicago where he worked under John H. Vanderpoel, Frederick Freer, and Wellington J. Reynolds. A few years before his death at age ninety, Dahlgreen gave one hundred etched plates to the Smithsonian Institution, which published a special edition of his prints; the proceeds from its sale supported significant acquisitions for the national print collection. These four oils are owned by the Janesville Art League, Janesville, Wisconsin.
           

Edward Timmons "The Philosopher"
H. 30" x W. 30" Before Treatment

Edward Timmons "Lake Geneva"
H. 28" x W. 22" Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment
           

Charles Dahlgreen "After a Spring Rain"
H. 27" x W. 22" Before Treatment

 

Dimitri Radoykoff "Market Place"
H. 19" x W. 25" Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment
           
           


           
452. William Stanley Haseltine (1835-1900) spent most of his career living and working in Europe. In 1855, he traveled to Germany to study landscape painting with Andreas Achenbach at the Düsseldorf Academy. From his home base in Rome, Haseltine spent the next two decades traveling and painting throughout Italy and the rest of Europe. He painted this view of the volcano Mt. Aetna while standing amid the ruins of an ancient theater in Taormina, a small village on the east coast of Sicily. The painting is owned by the Birmingham Museum of Art, Birmingham, Alabama.

W. S. Haseltine "Mt. Aetna"
H. 14" x W. 25" Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

After Treatment
           
           


           
453. In the spring of 1858, in Beardstown, Illinois, Abraham Lincoln defended Duff Armstrong accused of murder. A witness testified the moon was directly overhead, and it was as light as day; that he saw Armstrong strike the deceased. That night Lincoln went to a drug store and procured an almanac which showed there was no moon on the night of the assault resulting in the acquittal of his client. The courtroom is still used as a courtroom today. The right image depicts the town's founding by Thomas Beard.

Garm "The Founding of Beardstown"
H. 30" x W. 74" Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

After Treatment
           
           


           
454. Walter Shirlaw (18381909) was a Scottish-American artist. Shirlaw was born in Paisley, Scotland, and moved to the United States with his parents in 1840. He worked as a bank-note engraver, and his work was first exhibited at the National Academy in 1861. He was elected an academician of the Chicago Academy of Design in 1868. His pupils included Frederick Stuart Church. From 1870 to 1877 he studied in Munich, under George Raab and Wilhelm Lindenschmidt. His first work of importance was the Toning of the Bell (1874)--the author had the pleasure of treating this work while on staff at the Art Institute of Chicago. His largest work is the frieze for the dining-room in the house of Darius O. Mills in New York. Shirlaw has also earned an excellent reputation as an illustrator. He was one of the founders of the Society of American Artists, and was its first president. On his return from Europe he took charge of the Art Students League of New York, and for several years taught in the composition class. He became an associate of the National Academy in 1887. The below three oils are from the outstanding collection of the Muskegon Museum of Art, Muskegon, Michigan.
           

J. Currier "Ross Turner"
H.25" x W. 21" Before

Shirlaw "Still-Life"
H. 35" x W. 21" Before

J. Manship "Hudson Rover"
H. 24" x W. 36" Before
           

During Cleaning

After Treatment
           
           


           
455. Unlike most Dutch still life specialists, Jan van Huysum insisted on working out the details of his paintings from close study of the world around him. He once wrote a patron to explain that her painting would be delayed a year because, unable to obtain a real yellow rose, he could not finish the picture. Called by his contemporaries "the phoenix of all flower painters," he lived in Amsterdam his whole life and focused on flower pictures. Van Huysum was also a prolific draftsman whose drawings served as both preliminary studies and finished works. While viewers could contemplate the transience of flowers, their beauty was also a call to faith, as he pointed out by inscribing this Bible verse on a flower jar: "Consider the lilies of the field, Solomon in all his glory was not arrayed like one of these." The below three oils are from the collection of the Knox College, Galesburg, Illinois.
           

Netcher "Young Princess"
H. 24" x W. 20" Before

Huysum "Still-Life"
H. 32" x W. 26" Before

Bohumek "A. Lincoln"
H. 32" x W. 26" Before
           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment

After Treatment
           


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Barry Bauman Conservation
Contact: Mr. Barry Bauman
1122 N. Jackson Ave., River Forest, IL. 60305
Ph.(708)771-0382  Fax.(708)771-1532
e-mail:barrybbc7@yahoo.com