2011
Participating Institutions
 
 
416. Francis Coates Jones was born in Baltimore, Maryland in 1857. He first expressed an interest in art in 1876 when visiting Edwin Abbey. Jones and his brother, H. Bolton Jones, a painter of landscapes, then worked at Pont-Aven, Brittany in an artistic colony attended by Robert Wylie and Thomas Hovenden. Pont-Aven would soon become famous for Paul Gauguin painting there. In the autumn of 1877, Jones went to Paris to enroll at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts. He worked in the antique class under Henri Lehmann, traveling and sketching in France, Switzerland and Italy during the next five years. During The winter of 1879 to 1880, Jones was in London, working on a military panorama. Returning to France, he continued his studies under the direction of William Alolphe Bouguereau and Jules Joseph Lefebvre, and attended a special class at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts. Although his paintings reflected contemporary scenes, Jones interest in costumes and decorative objects was always apparent. It is this interest we see in the upper left oil. The four paintings wee brought in for treatment by Shaun Dingwerth, executive director, the Richmond art Museum, Richmond, Indiana.
           

Francis C. Jones "The Dancer"
H. 36" x W. 30" Before Treatment

Anon. "The Money Lender"
H. 28" x W. 22" Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment
           

George Baker "The Volunteer"
H. 24" x W. 30" Before Treatment

Henry Dousa "Cows"
H. 30" x W. 42" Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment
           
           


           
417. Under the guidance of Ms. Rachel Perry, fine arts curator for the Indiana State Museum in Indianapolis, Indiana, these four oils represent 70 paintings that have been conserved for their collecion over the last seven years. The pictured oils are all from the hand of T. C. Steele, the leading artist of the Hoosier School of Midwestern Impressionists. Steele was born in 1847 and died in 1926. During his formative years he moved to Munich and studied at the Royal Academy of Art with Frank Duveneck and Ludwig Loefftz. In 1885 he returned to Indianapolis and established an art school with William Forsyth. While his landscapes are his signature style, he was also a very fine portrait artist. Today he is remembered as Indiana's finest artist from the early part of the 20th century.
           

T. C. Steele"Deavret Hills"
H. 25" x W. 30" Before Treatment

T. C. Steele"Church in the Town"
H. 19" x W. 31" Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment
           

T. C. Steele"Flowers"
H. 25" x W. 30" Before Treatment

T. C. Steele"Trees in the Hills"
H. 20" x W. 28" Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment
           
           


           
           
418. The right image is a portrait of Henry Homes Porter (1835-1910)- a quite remarkable Chicagoan who had a second home on Wisconsin's Geneva Lake - this one having been designed by Henry Lord Gay, modified, substantially, pursuant to designs by William Le Baron Jenney, and having a landscape designed by Warren Manning, a protégé of Frederick Law Olmsted. Mr Porter was a banker and railroad man contributing to the growth of the Belt Railway Company of Chicago. The portrait is owned by the Geneva Lake Museum of History, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin. The signature of John W. Alexander was discovered during the treatment procedures.

John W. Alexander "Henry Homes Porter"
H. 50" x W. 36" Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

After Treatment
           
           


           
419. Henry Ward Ranger (1858-1916) is credited with founding the New Lyme art colony in New Lyme, Connecticut in 1899. Later the next year he brought Lewis Cohen, Alphonse Jongers, Henry Rankin Poore, Louis Paul Dessar and William Howe, the true pioneers of the colony. These artists were called Tonalists because of their use of limited colors (often browns and greens) and delicate modulations of light to create effects of mood and form. Initially Ranger studied in Holland where he became active with the Hague School painters. These influences remained with him throughout his career. The pictured image is owned by Knox College in Galesburg, Illinois.

Henry Ward Ranger "Moonlit Scene"
H. 28" x W. 36" Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

After Treatment
           
           


           
420. This WWI scene was donated to the Oshkosh Public Museum, Oshkosh, Wisconsin by Esther A. Christensen, the widow of Harvey C. Christensen. Christensen (1896-1952) reported for active duty on July 15, 1917 when Company F became Company C, 150th Machine Gun Battalion, 42nd "Rainbow Division". He was hospitalized with Shell Shock on July 30, 1918 near Chateau Thierry, France and returned from France with his company in April 1919. The artist is presumably Flora M. Smith, wife of Reverend Frank L. Smith, pastor at the Second Baptist Church in Oshkosh, WI .

F. Smith "WWI Scene"
H. 14" x W. 24" Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

After Treatment
           
           


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Barry Bauman Conservation
Contact: Mr. Barry Bauman
1122 N. Jackson Ave., River Forest, IL. 60305
Ph.(708)771-0382  Fax.(708)771-1532
e-mail:barrybbc7@yahoo.com