2009
Participating Institutions
 
 
326. Henri Fantin-Latour (1836-1904 was born to a Russian mother and a French father, who was a portrait painter and drawing teacher, Fantin-Latour became a well known French painter and lithographer in the classical tradition of the Old Masters. He moved with his family to Paris in1841 and took lessons from his father. This instruction was followed by short enrollments at the École des Beaux Arts and then work in the studio of Gustave Courbet. In 1853 he made his living by copying Old Master paintings at the Louvre, where he made the acquaintance of Edgar Degas, Edouard Manet and Berthe Morisot. He became close friends with James McNeill Whistler and with Whistler and Alphonse Legros, formed the Société des Trois. In 1859, he visited Whistler in London and he became a part of the sophisticated art society of London. In 1861 and 1862, he first exhibited at the Paris Salon. His work was met with critical acclaim and today, along with Chardin, he is well placed as one of the most unique French still-life artists. The two below oils are owned by Augustana College, Rock Island, Illinois.
           

Henri Fantin-Latour "Floral Still Life"
H. 20" x W. 16" Before Treatment

Julius Hoftrup "Augustana College" 1927
H. 22" x W. 27" Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment
           
           


           

327. Paul Desire Trouillebert (1829-1900) was born in Paris in 1829 and died in the city June 28, 1900. He is considered a portrait, genre and landscape painter from the French Barbizon School. He was a student of Ernest Hébert and Charles-François Jalabert and made his debut at the Salon of 1865. At the Salon of 1869, Trouillebert exhibited "Au bois Rossignolet", which was a lyrical Fontainebleau landscape that received great acclaim. Trouillebert concentrated on portraits until about 1881, when he began to focus on atmospheric silvery landscapes steeping in cool damp color. After the 1860's, the Barbizon landscapes by Jean-Baptist- Camille Corot's had become astonishingly vogue, which brought about a trove of imitators. His followers and students and Trouillebert were not trying to mislead the public, he was their idol. However, the greatest confusion has always been over works by Corot and Trouillebert because both artists painted river landscapes at dawn or dusk with a very similar approach, palette and style.

Trouillebert would receive the most attention as a result of an 1883 court case involving one of his paintings. The painting "La Fontaine des Gabourets" had been sold by one of Paris' more prominent dealers George Pettit to writer Alexandre Dumas fils. Trouillebert's signature and been removed and resigned Corot. The fake was discovered and returned to the original seller, Tedesco. Trouillebert, who had nothing to do with the fraud, brought legal action against the guilty parties to regain his reputation and clear his name. The trial made all of the papers and Trouillebert won his case. George Pettit was also cleared because he had purchased the painting in good faith. Both artists benefited from all of the attention brought by the newspaper articles. These four oils are owned by the Muskegon Museum of Art, Muskegon, Michigan.

           

Paul Desire Trouillebert "Path with Two Figures"
H. 16" x W. 9" Before Treatment

Joseph Grey "Three Muses" 1955
H. 24" x W. 18" Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment
           

George Ames Aldrich "The River"
H. 18" x W. 24" Before Treatment

Robert Hopkin "Schooner on a Rough Sea" 1895
H. 12" x W. 16" Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment

           


           

328. John Elwood Bundy (1853-1933) was part of the Richmond School of Indiana painters and Richmond's premier artist,. John Bundy was born in Guilford County, North Carolina and was raised on a farm in Morgan County, Indiana near Monrovia. He spent nearly a decade in New York City as a portraitist but he decided to focus on landscape painting. He worked in both oil and watercolor, and much of his subject matter came from Wayne County, Indiana, especially the Whitewater Valley.

In 1888, he moved to Richmond and for eight years headed the Art Department at Earlham College where he taught drawing and painting. During that time, a book of his etchings, Fond Recollections was published and reflected his love of the scenery around Earlham.He exhibited widely across the United States including the 1904 Louisiana Purchase Exposition, the Pennsylvania Academy in 1904, the National Academy of Design in 1911 and 1916, the Chicago Art Institute in 1903 and 1907-1914, the Hoosier Salon in 1925, and the 1902 Society of Western Artists. In 1929, Bundy died in a sanatorium in Cincinnati on January 17, 1933. These oils are all owned by the Greater Lafayette Museum of Art. Lafayette, Indiana.

           

John Bundy "Fall Landscape"
H. 12" x W. 9" Before Treatment

John Vawter "Twilight"
H. 20" x W. 24" Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment
           

George Wilstach "River Landscape"
H. 28" x W. 36" Before Treatment

Charles Connor "White Peaked Mountains"
H. 8" x W. 15" Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment
           
           

           
329. George Winter (1809-1876) was born in England. He frequented London's museums and galleries as a young man but apparently received no formal training in art. In 1830, Winter emigrated to New York where he studied for a short time at the National Academy of Design. In 1837, he arrived by stagecoach in the frontier town of Logansport, Indiana, coming, as he said, "..to the Wabash for the purpose...of seeing and learning something of the Indians and exercising the pencil in the (sic.) direction." During his lifetime, Winter documented a vanishing culture. He obtained the confidence of the Miami and Potawatomi Indians and had unique opportunities to sketch them as an artist, but, like an historian, he kept accurate records and wrote prolifically about his paintings and the subjects and circumstances of his works. These three paintings are owned by the Tippecanoe County Historical Association, Lafayette, Indiana and well represent his artistic endeavors.
           

G. Winter "Landscape"
H. 24" x W. 36" Before

G. Winter "Francis Godfrey"
H. 38" x W. 30" Before

Thomas Sully "Port. Woman"
H. 20" x W. 24" Before
           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment

After Treatment
           


           
330. The Scholte House, Pella, Iowa, built in the winter and spring of 1847-1848, was the fulfillment of a promise Dominie Hendrik Scholte made to his wife Mareah to alleviate her homesickness and disappointment. He had promised to build her a house with all the comforts of the home she had left in The Netherlands. Remaining much as it was in Pella's early days, some rooms now play different roles, and others have been added. In this treasured house lies much of the earliest history of de kolonie. Since the Scholte house was built in 1848, some of its 22 rooms have always been occupied by Scholte descendants. The last Scholte descendant to live in the house was Leonora Gaass Hettinga. She and her brother and sister-in-law, Peter and Norma Gaass, then gave the house to the Pella Historical Society in 1979 for use as a museum. This two 19th-century oils are part of the museum's collection
           

Anon. "Swan Pond"
H. 18" x W. 24" Before Treatment

Anon. "Dutch Winter Scene"
H. 17" x W. 20" Before Treatment
         

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment
           
           


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Barry Bauman Conservation
Contact: Mr. Barry Bauman
1122 N. Jackson Ave., River Forest, IL. 60305
Ph.(708)771-0382  Fax.(708)771-1532
e-mail:barrybbc7@yahoo.com