2009
Participating Institutions
 
 
296. Built in 1914, the Union Station of Kansas City, Missouri encompasses 850,000 square feet and originally featured 900 rooms. In its prime, as a working train station, it accommodated tens of thousands of passengers every year. At its peak during WWII, an estimated one million travelers passed through the Station. Closed in the 1980s, the Station sat empty and neglected, escaping demolition on several occasions. In 1996, a historic bi-state initiative was passed to fund the Station's renovation, which was completed in 1999. The Station is once again a popular destination for the surrounding community. It also draws tourists from all over the world who marvel at the Grand Hall's 95-foot ceiling, three 3,500-pound chandeliers and the six-foot wide clock hanging in the Station's central arch.Union Station also houses the permanent collections and archives for the Union Station Kansas City, Inc./Kansas City Museum. Nineteen of their paintings were recently water damaged in a storage facility. Four of these works are imaged below.
           

Alfred Hart "Mary Ann Beall Baker" 1867
H. 30" x W. 25" Before Treatment

John Patrick "Joseph Van Clief Karnes"
H. 30" x W. 24" Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment
           

J. C. Marine "E. M. McGee"
H. 23" x W. 23" Before Treatment

J. C. Marine. "Isaac Ridge"
H 30" x W. 25" Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment
           
           


           
297. These three oils are part of the recent acquisitions gifted into the collection of the Smart Museum of Art at the University of Chicago from the estate of Dr. and Mrs. Edward Maser. Dr. Maser was a brilliant professor at the University specializing in Italian 17th and 18th Century art. He also held the position of Director at the Smart Museum for many years. The University will be showcasing all of the gifts, including paintings and drawings, in an upcoming exhibit.
           

Anon. "Flaying Marsyas"
H. 26" x W. 19" Before

Conrad.Geiger
"Alexander and Campaspe"
H. 13" x W. 18" Before

Anon. "Musical Contest"
H. 26" x W. 19" Before
           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment

After Treatment
           
           


           
298. Since its opening in April, 1992, the Anderson Arts Center has welcomed thousands of visitors. The 9,000 square foot mansion that houses the Arts Center began life as a private residence, a fact that still fascinates new visitors to the facility. The majestic ceilings and large, open expanses of wall space, which were distinctive features of the mansion, now lend themselves perfectly to the display of art work. Construction began in 1929 and was completed in 1931. The house itself occupies more than 9000 square feet. The home is set on 4.7 acres of landscaped grounds. This oil is from the Mansion's collection.

R. Kreisa "Glorious Spring"
H. 29" x W. 39" Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

After Treatment
           
           


           
299. Born in Cornwall, Vermont, Sheldon Peck (1797-1868) became an itinerant portrait painter. He was self-taught and did not sign his work, but his distinctive style of using a long brushstroke flanked by two shorter ones--resembling a rabbit's foot has become his signature. His early works, family portraits in Vermont, were brushed onto wood panels, and he used somber colors, dark backgrounds, and detailed clothing. An 1840 census listed Sheldon Peck's occupation as farmer. The 1850 census recorded his occupation as a portrait painter. The below paintings are owned by the Philbrook Art Museum in Tulsa, Oklahoma.
           

Daniel Lang "Granery Road" 1915
H. 36" x W. 48" Before Treatment

Sheldon Peck "Man in Black" ca. 1836
H. 31" x W. 21" Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment
           
           


           
300. The right painting is owned by Terrace Hill in Des Moines, Iowa. Benjamin Franklin Allen, Iowa's first millionaire, built Terrace Hill as his family home. Construction of this 18,000-square-foot home began in 1866 and was completed in 1869. Today, Terrace Hill is the official home of Iowa's governors. The right landscape was completed by Charles Atherton Cumming (1859-1932) who was an important Iowa artist. He was a true "founder" involved in the organizing and developing of schools of art while teaching and pursuing his own career. He originally studied at Cornell College in Iowa but later transferred to the Chicago Academy of Art, which later became the Art Institute of Chicago. He returned to Cornell in 1880 and taught art classes before leaving in 1855 for the Academie Julien in Paris. He returned to Iowa and established schools in Des Moines and at the State University of Iowa, Iowa City. He was well recognized for his portrait work.

Charles Cumming "Road to S. Haven" 1900
H. 20" x W. 27" Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

After Treatment

           
           


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Barry Bauman Conservation
Contact: Mr. Barry Bauman
1122 N. Jackson Ave., River Forest, IL. 60305
Ph.(708)771-0382  Fax.(708)771-1532
e-mail:barrybbc7@yahoo.com