2009
Participating Institutions
 
 
286. The Oshkosh Public Museum has a large and varied collection. This piece represents a wonderful snapshot of Wisconsin and social history. While titled "Indian Cabin," it would have been rare for native Indians at this time period to live in such a structure.

Unsigned "Indian Cabin" ca. 1890
H. 16" x W. 20" Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

After Treatment
           
           
287. These three images are part of the collection of the DuSable Museum of African-American History in Chicago. The left image is by Ellis Wilson (1899-1977). His work can be found in the collections of many museums, including the Smithsonian's National Gallery of Art. He was born in Kentucky but moved to Chicago in 1918 to attend the School of the Art Institute. After graduation, he stayed in Chicago for five years before moving to New York in 1928. From 1935 to 1940, Ellis was employed by the government's Works Progress Administration Federal Arts Project. In 1944, Ellis was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship. In his own time, though, Ellis never quite managed to make a living at painting. When he died in 1977 in New York, he was buried in an unmarked pauper's grave. Its location today is unknown. The center image is by Claude Clark (1915-2001). Clark was an easel painter who did a variety of work ranging from figures, flower studies, landscapes, boat marine life and nonobjective abstracts. Clark's work can be found at the Smithsonian Museum in Washington D.C. and the de Young Museum in San Francisco as well as many other national museums.
           

Charles Ellis "Mask"
H. 19" x W. 14" Before

Claude Clark "Execution"
H. 20" x W. 24" Before

D. McIlvaine "Four Woman"
H. 36" x W. 20" Before
           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment

After Treatment
           
           

           
288. The center image is by Glen Cooper Henshaw. Henshaw was born in Windfall, Indiana in 1884. He later moved to the East Coast, living in Baltimore, Maryland and later New York City. Hr studied at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts in Paris, where he was influenced by impressionism. He exhibited at the Herron Art Institute in Indianapolis and the Art Institute at Chicago. In 1941 he moved to Nashville, Indiana, in Brown County, where he purchased the Odd Fellows Building, and spent summers there for the five years remaining of his life. Brown County, termed "The Art Colony of the Midwest," was one of six major art colonies in the early 1900s. A painter of portraits and cityscapes prior to 1941, Henshaw continued with these genres in Nashville, also painting some landscapes. He died in 1946. These three oils are owned by the the South Bend Regional Museum of Art. South Bend, Indiana.
           

Mary Williams "Still-Life"
H. 12" x W. 18" Before

Glen Cooper "Mountain Sunset"
H. 25" x W. 33" Before

Guy Wiser "Charles Carlisle"
H. 40" x W. 34" Before
           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment

After Treatment
           
           


           
289. Criss Glasell (1898-1971) was born outside of Vienna, Austria and came to the United States with her family when she was 12 years old. They first lived in Madison, Wisconsin and then later moved to Chicago where she enrolled at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Shortly after the Depression they decided to move from Chicago to Dubuque Iowa where she met and studied with Grant Wood, Thomas Hart Benton, Francisa Chapin and Adrian Dornbush. Glasell and family attended Grant Wood's Stone City Art Colony in the summer of 1932. Both Criss and her husband Don worked on WPA projects supervised by Grant Wood. She was awarded the WPA mural commission for the Leon Iowa post office. Glasell continued to actively exhibit her work in many regional, state and national exhibitions and fairs, winning many prizes. Her work was exhibited at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art, The Corcoran Gallery of Art, The Joslyn Memorial, and the Kansas City Art Institute. These four oils are from the collection of the Brunnier Art Museum at Iowa State University in Ames, Iowa.
           

Lawton Patten "Winter Blue" 1941--WPA
H. 24" x W. 30" Befsore Treatment

Charles Houget "Storm at the Coast" ca. 1870
H. 13" x W. 18" Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Tratment
           

E.O.W. "Dr. Edward Allen"
H. 45" x W. 31" Before Treatment

Criss Glasell "Street Scene" 1937--WPA
H. 27" x W. 24" Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment
           
           


           
290. The Indiana State Museum is the owner of these four oils and hundreds of works by T. C. Steele, the leading artist of the Hoosier School of Midwestern Impressionists. Steele was born in 1847 and died in 1926. During his formative years he moved to Munich and studied at the Royal Academy of Art with Frank Duveneck and Ludwig Loefftz. In 1885 he returned to Indianapolis and established an art school with William Forsyth. While his landscapes are his signature style, he was also a very fine portrait artist. Today he is remembered as Indiana's finest artist from the early part of the 20th century. The museum houses over 350 paintings from this artist's estate.
           

T. C. Steele "Blue Hills and Sky"
H. 20" x W. 28" Before Treatment

T. C. Steele "Birches"
H. 30" x W. 24" Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment
           

T. C. Steele "Rainy Day, the Home"
H. 22" x W. 29" Before Treatment

T. C. Steele "The Tower in the Village"
H. 18" x W. 28" Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment
           
           


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Barry Bauman Conservation
Contact: Mr. Barry Bauman
1122 N. Jackson Ave., River Forest, IL. 60305
Ph.(708)771-0382  Fax.(708)771-1532
e-mail:barrybbc7@yahoo.com