2008
Participating Institutions
 
 
256. This five feet (5') tall by twenty-five (25') long mural was painted by Newton Alonzo Wells. Wells was an Art Department faculty member at the University of Illinois in Champaign, Illinois and a well-known muralist and portrait painter who painted at least four other murals and eleven oil portrait paintings on their campus. The mural was painted sometime before 1911 depicting an early Illinois football game supposedly against the University of Chicago. It originally hung in the Illinois Trust Savings Bank at 10 East Main Street in downtown Champaign along with another mural on an opposite wall also by Wells. In 1929 the bank went bankrupt during the Depression and someone purchased the painting at public auction for $200.00. It has hung in Huff Hall on the University's campus since then. Consulting services are being provided to the University to oversee the painting's relocation.

Newton Alonzo Wells "Scrimage"
H. 5' x W. 25'     1911
           
           


           
257. The lower paintings are owned by the Kenosha Public Museum in Kenosha, Wisconsin. Peter Bianchi was born in Kenosha in 1920. His early studies were carried out at the Mizen Academy of Art in Chicago, the Chicago Academy of Art and the American Academy of Art. While working on a project for National Geographic, on the Dead Sea Scrolls, Bianchi had the opportunity to experiment with scientific illustration. His work was so well received, he was invited to join the staff of the magazine and continued his work there for fourteen years. He collaborated with scientific specialists to illustrate Louis Leakey's great 1959 Tanzanian discovery of "Zinjanthropus." Peter Bianchi died in 2001.
           

Peter Bianchi "Chan Chan Funeral"
Before Treatment

Peter Bianchi "Chan Chan Weavers"
Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment
           

Peter Bianchi "Nemrud Dagh"
Before Treatment

Peter Bianchi "Hannibal"
Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment
           
           


           
258. These three images are part of the collection of the DuSable Museum of African-American History in Chicago. The left and right images are by Ellis Wilson (1899-1977). His work can be found in the collections of many museums, including the Smithsonian's National Gallery of Art. He was born in Kentucky but moved to Chicago in 1918 to attend the School of the Art Institute. After graduation, he stayed in Chicago for five years before moving to New York in 1928. From 1935 to 1940, Ellis was employed by the government's Works Progress Administration Federal Arts Project. In 1944, Ellis was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship. In his own time, though, Ellis never quite managed to make a living at painting. When he died in 1977 in New York, he was buried in an unmarked pauper's grave. Its location today is unknown. The center image is by Claude Clark (1915-2001). Clark was an easel painter who did a variety of work ranging from figures, flower studies, landscapes, boat marine life and nonobjective abstracts. Clark's work can be found at the Smithsonian Museum in Washington D.C. and the de Young Museum in San Francisco as well as many other national museums.
           

Ellis Wilson "Chinese Lily"
H. 16" x W. 12" Before

Claude Clark "The Saw"
H. 24" x W. 20" Before

Ellis Wilson "Mask"
H. 14" x W. 10" Before
           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment

After Treatment
           
           


           
259. Howard Pyle (1853 ­ 1911) was an American illustrator and writer, primarily of books for young audiences. A native of Wilmington, Delaware, he spent the last year of his life in Florence, Italy. In 1894 he began teaching illustration at the Drexel Institute of Art, Science and Industry (now Drexel University), and after 1900 he founded his own school of art and illustration (later called the Brandywine School). Some of his more famous students were Olive Rush, N. C. Wyeth, Frank Schoonover, Elenore Abbott, and Jessie Willcox Smith. His 1883 classic The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood remains in print to this day, and his other books, frequently with medieval European settings, include a four-volume set on King Arthur that cemented his reputation. He wrote an original work, Otto of the Silver Hand, in 1888. He also illustrated historical and adventure stories for periodicals such as Harper's Weekly and St. Nicholas Magazine. His Men of Iron was made into a movie in 1954, The Black Shield of Falworth. Pyle was widely respected during his life, and continues to be highly regarded, by illustrators and fine artists. His contemporary, Vincent van Gogh spoke of Pyle in a letter to his brother, saying that Pyle's work "struck me dumb with admiration". Pyle travelled to Florence, Italy to study mural painting in 1910, and died there in 1911 of sudden kidney infection. These two oils are owned by the Neville Public Museum, Green Bay, Wisconsin.
           

Howard Pyle "Slaves at Jamestown"
H. 24" x W. 16" Before Treatment

Howard Pyle "Peter Stuyvesant"
H. 24" x W. 16" Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment
           
           


           
260. The Indiana State Museum is the owner of hundreds of works by T. C. Steele, the leading artist of the Hoosier School of Midwestern Impressionists. Steele was born in 1847 and died in 1926. During his formative years he moved to Munich and studied at the Royal Academy of Art with Frank Duveneck and Ludwig Loefftz. In 1885, he returned to Indianapolis and established an art school with William Forsyth. While his landscapes are his signature style, he was also a very fine portrait artist. Today he is remembered as Indiana's finest artist from the early part of the 20th century. With these four oils, a total of 52 canvases have been conserved for the museum over the last four years.
           

T. C. Steele "Vase of Flowers" 1915
H. 22" x W. 29" Before Treatment

T. C. Steele "Vase of Flowers" 1920
H. 20" x W. 24" Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment
           

Anon. "Jane Fauntleroy"
H. 27" x W. 22" After Treatment

Anon. "Robert Fauntleroy"
H. 27" x W. 22" After Treatment
           


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Barry Bauman Conservation
Contact: Mr. Barry Bauman
1122 N. Jackson Ave., River Forest, IL. 60305
Ph.(708)771-0382  Fax.(708)771-1532
e-mail:barrybbc7@yahoo.com