2008
Participating Institutions
 
 
216. These two oils are owned by the Art Museum of Greater Lafayette, in Lafayette, Indiana. The left mural is by William Edouard Scott (1884-1964). The author has had the ability to treat all of his murals in the Chicago Public Schools. A rare Africa-American artist for his time, Scott initially studied at the Art Institute of Chicago. He then traveled to Europe where he studied in Paris at the Académie Julian and also with the great Henry Ossawa Tanner. The right image is a wonderful landscape by Lawrence Mazzanovich (1872 - 1959). Mazzanovich was born in 1872 at sea off the coast of California. He studied at the Art Institute of Chicago and later at the Art Student's League of New York. Traveling abroad, he visited Paris and Fontainebleau, where he encountered impressionism and saw the late works of Monet. He exhibited in the Beaux Arts in 1900.
           

William Edouard Scott "The Cock Fight"
H. 54" X W. 119" After Treatment

Lawrence Mazzanovich "New England Hills"
H. 30" X W. 30" After Treatment
           
           


           
217. This portrait was painted by William Cogswell (1819-1903). Cogswell was a self-taught artist who rose to great fame. His best-known work is the portrait of Lincoln, which now hangs in the White House. It was President Grant who selected the portrait for the White House. Cogswell also painted a portrait of Grant that now hangs in the U.S. Senate. This painting is an image of Jairus Fairchild (1801 - 1862), the first state treasurer of Wisconsin, (1848-1852) and, in 1856, Madison's first city mayor. The portrait is owned by the Wisconsin State Historical Society, Madison.

William Cogswell "Jairus Fairchild" ca. 1845
H. 30" X W. 25" Before Treatment

           

During Cleaning

After Treatment
           
           


           
218. These three images are part of the collection of the DuSable Museum of African-American History in Chicago. The left and right images are by Ellis Wilson (1899-1977). His work can be found in the collections of many museums, including the Smithsonian's National Gallery of Art. He was born in Kentucky but moved to Chicago in 1918 to attend the School of the Art Institute. After graduation, he stayed in Chicago for five years before moving to New York in 1928. From 1935 to 1940, Ellis was employed by the government's Works Progress Administration Federal Arts Project. In 1944, Ellis was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship. In his own time, though, Ellis never quite managed to make a living at painting. When he died in 1977 in New York, he was buried in an unmarked pauper's grave. Its location today is unknown.
           
Charles Sebree (1914-1985) was one of many noted artists to emerge out of Chicago's black arts scene of the 1930s and 1940s. The network of support with such institutions as the South Side Community Arts Center and the Art Institute constituted a system through which black artists could forge a career. After attending the Art Institute of Chicago, Sebree interacted with a group of artists centered in Chicago's South Side. The vitality of Chicago's black arts movement came to rival that of Harlem, and Sebree benefited from the involvement. Sebree maintained a strong interest in the theater and often produced paintings of saltimbanques and harlequins. His below image is certainly reminiscent of this influence.
           
Painter, etcher, and teacher, William St. John Harper (1851 - 1910) lived and painted in East Hampton. He studied at the National Academy of Design with William M. Chase and Walter Shirlaw. He was president of the Art Students' League in 1881 and Associate member of the National Academy of Design. Harper conducted a summer art school in East Hampton in 1898.
           

Wilson "White Flowers"
H. 23" X W. 9" Before

Sebree "The Clown"
H. 12" X W. 14" Before

Harper "Country Landscape"
H. 30" X W. 34" Before
           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment

After Treatment

           
           


           
219. The Philbrook Museum, Tulsa, Oklahoma is the owner of these two oils. The left image in an early, 19th Century, "Portrait of Isabella Storm." The painting has been poorly restored in the past and will require extensive work to return it to an exhibitable appearance. The during-cleaning image details the removal of the yellowed varnish from the face, and four layers of overpaint from the background. The right image is titled, "Deer at Fontainebleau." The work is signed and dated, 1891, and is from the hand of the Rosa Bonheur (1822-1899). Bonheur was born into an artistic family and was encouraged to paint and draw from a young age. She gained early acclaim and showed at the French Salons beginning in 1841, at the age of nineteen. After her 1853 masterpiece "The Horse Fair" ("Le Marché aux Chevaux"), now in the Metropolitan Museum, became world famous, two interesting things happened. Rosa began receiving honors, including the Légion d'Honneur (from the Empress Eugénie, in 1865), previously only held by men. Secondly, retreating from the limelight, she bought an estate near the Forest of Fontainebleau and settled there. She is arguably considered the finest female animal painter from the 19th Century.
           

Anon. "Isabella Storm"
H. 50" X W. 40" Before Treatment

Rosa Bonheur "Deer at FountaineBleau"
H. 24" X W. 32" Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment
           
           


           
220. These two oils are owned by the Flint Institute of Arts, Flint, Michigan. The left image is by Maurice Utrillo (1883-1955). Utrillo was the son of Suzanne Valadon, an artist and also a model for Puvis de Chavannes, Renoir and Toulouse-Lautrec. Plagued by alcoholism and mental disorders, Utrillo was encouraged to paint in order to release his on-going stresses. While he was in and out of mental institutions most of his life, he continued to paint and by the 1920s was well recognized for his abilities. He never followed current traditions or adhered to the major artistic currents, the "Fauvist", "Cubist" or "Post-Impressionist" movements. His landscapes contain simple buildings erected by human hands. They are the foundations of villages, suburbs and towns. The right image was acquired by the museum as a Sir Augustus Wall Callcott. A discovered signature in the lower right corner attributes the painting to Harry Thompson.
           

Maurice Utrillo "Le Lapine Agile"
H. 21" X W. 28" Before Treatment

Harry Thompson "Landscape"
H. 22" X W. 30" Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment

           
           


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Barry Bauman Conservation
Contact: Mr. Barry Bauman
1122 N. Jackson Ave., River Forest, IL. 60305
Ph.(708)771-0382  Fax.(708)771-1532
e-mail:barrybbc7@yahoo.com