2007
Participating Institutions
 
 
201. Born in Charlestown, Indiana in 1852, Harvey Joiner showed artistic capability at an early age. At the age of 16, Joiner worked on boats on the bayous of Louisiana, where he completed sketches of African-American culture. In the spring of 1874, he met a German portrait painter in St. Louis and became his assistant and pupil. Joiner was a prolific painter, completing more than 5,000 paintings. He concentrated on portraits for the first twenty years of his career. Later he became famous for his woodland scenes, especially of beech trees, and exhibited all over the world. He died in 1932. The left image is a WPA oil by Roff Beman (1891-1940) while the center image is by Harriet Hill (1847-1921). All three paintings are owned by the University of Kentucky Art Museum.
           

Harvey Joiner "Landscape" 1920
H. 24" X W. 40" Before

Harriet Hill "Post Office, River Oise"
H. 19" X W. 25" Before

R. Beman "Bedroom Window" 1935
WPA    H. 40" X W. 24" Before

           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment

After Treatment
           
           


           

Helen J. Hinrichsen "Davenport Centennial Mural: 1836-1936"
H. 96" X W. 360"
           
202. The Figge Art Museum, Davenport, Iowa is the owner of a 16-panel mural by Helen J. Hinrichsen (1896-1983). The title of the mural is the "Davenport Centennial Mural: 1836-1936." Former Curator of the Davenport Art Gallery, Ann C. Madonia, wrote a brochure on the artist and the mural's history. Her material will be quoted in four sections, as the mural will also be treated in four sections. The first narrative is in on Page 28, the second on Page 33, the third on Page 38. This is the final section, edited.
           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

The Davenport Centennial Mural illustrated in continuous narrative the history of the first one-hundred years of the City. Strong diagonals are designed throughout to convey a sense of dynamic energy to the scenes and the individuals portrayed. Visually the mural is divided into three sections. The first, The Indians, is bounded by trees on the left and right. It depicts the battles between the Indians and the Army troopers who sought control of the Mississippi river and the land on either side.

The center section, The Pioneers, portrays the arrival of the settlers and the establishment of Davenport. The scene is dominated by the pyramid of figures surrounding the plan of the town which was surveyed by Major William Gordon. The last scene, The Builders, marks the transition from the pioneer period to contemporary Davenport of 1936. Uniting the visual sections of the mural is the treatment of the sky. The threatening storm sky of the Indian period retreats in the Pioneer section, and finally clears in the last scene. The shaft of light that pours over the last scene represents the spirit of optimism and faith which originally inspired this celebration of Davenport's centennial.

           

Walter Quirt "A Man Who Made a Dollar" 1951
H. 38" X W. 44" After Treatment
           
The above image is by Walter Quirt. Quirt studied art at the Layton School of Art in Wisconsin from 1921 until 1923 and later at the McDowell Colony in New Hampshire in 1928. He was one of the most vital and active figures of the New York avant-garde art world of the 1930s. He worked for the Works Project Administration painting murals in the mid-1930s. Quirt became one of the first American artists to experiment with Surrealism. He showed during his career at the Art Institute of Chicago, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the Detroit Institute of Arts. Quirt died March 19, 1968 in Minneapolis, Minnesota.
           
           


           
203. Charles Atherton Cumming (1859-1932) was an important Iowa artist. He was a true "founder" involved in the organizing and developing of schools of art while teaching and pursuing his own career. He originally studied at Cornell College in Iowa but later transferred to the Chicago Academy of Art, which later became the Art Institute of Chicago. He returned to Cornell in 1880 and taught art classes before leaving in 1855 for the Academie Julien in Paris. He returned to Iowa and established schools in Des Moines and at the State University of Iowa, Iowa City. He was well recognized for his portraiture. The upper left painting is from his hand. All four portraits are owned by the State Historical Society of Iowa.
           

Charles Cumming "Portrait of F.M. Hubbell"
H. 48" X 36" Before Treatment

W.A. Reager "Portrait of a Man" 1910
H. 48" X W. 36" Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment
           

Harold MacDonald "Portrait of a Woman" 1904
H. 30" X W. 35" Before Treatment

Alice Mackee "Mrs. Beryl F. Carroll" 1925
H. 25" X W. 18" Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment
           
           


           
204. Throughout his career Antonin Sterba (1875-1963) traveled to a number of vacation areas to paint on site. He depicted subjects and views from Mexico, St. Augustine, Lake Geneva, and Wisconsin. He taught for many years at the Art Institute of Chicago. The oils are on display at Montauk, the historic site that is former Iowa Governor William Larrabee's residence. Larrabee was Iowa's 12th Governor. His Italianate mansion of brick and native limestone was built in 1874. Montauk sits on a hill about 200 feet higher than the town of Clermont which is about a mile to the south. It's an imposing 14-room brick and stone house in a grassy clearing surrounded by 100,000 trees.
           

Antonin Sterba "Landscape"
H. 13" X W. 15" After Treatment

Antonin Sterba "Landscape"
H. 14" X W. 11" After Treatment
           
           


           
205. Benjamin Franklin Allen, Iowa's first millionaire, built Terrace Hill as his family home. Construction of this 18,000-square-foot home began in 1866 and was completed in 1869. The original cost of $250,000 included the Mansion, Carriage House, all of the furnishings, and approximately 30 acres of land. The house contained very modern features for its time, such as hot and cold running water, gas lights, a lift, and indoor restrooms. Terrace Hill was built on the far-western edge of Des Moines. It was referred to as "The Palace of the Prairie." William Boyington, a popular Chicago architect of his time, designed Terrace Hill. One of his other works is the Water Tower in Chicago, which survived the great Chicago fire. Today, Terrace Hill is the official home of Iowa's governors.
           
Both of these oils are owned by the organization. The left image is by Grant Wood. Wood, (February 13, 1891 ­ February 12, 1942) was born in Anamosa, Iowa. He is best known for his paintings depicting the rural American Midwest. His WPA mural work is a significant part of his career. He designed the murals at Iowa State University in Ames, Iowa.
           

Grant Wood "Cornstalks" 1927
H. 13" X W. 15" Before Treatment

Seymour Thomas "Portrait of Mrs. Hubbell"
H. 29
1/2" X W. 31 3/4" Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment
           
           


Home, Page 42, 43, 44

 





Barry Bauman Conservation
Contact: Mr. Barry Bauman
1122 N. Jackson Ave., River Forest, IL. 60305
Ph.(708)771-0382  Fax.(708)771-1532
e-mail:barrybbc7@yahoo.com