2007
Participating Institutions
 
 
191. The Spertus Museum of Judaica has an outstanding collection of fine art as well as ceremonial artifacts. The lower four oil are by Todros Geller (1889-1949). Geller was born in the Ukraine of Russia. In 1906, when he was seventeen years old, he immigrated with his family to Montreal, Canada. There he studied art, married and then moved to Chicago in 1918. He continued his art studies at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and became a leading artist within the city's art community. He was a source of inspiration to others, including Aaron Bohrod and Mitchell Siporin. Geller's works are in the collections of the Art Institute of Chicago, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York, and the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C.
           

Todros Geller "Landscape with Figure" 1924
H. 18" X W. 20" Before Treatment

Todros Geller "Church Landscape"
H. 20" X W. 18" Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment
           

Todros Geller "Vase of Flowers" 1931
H. 20" X W. 16" Before Treatment

Todros Geller "Portrait of a Woman"
H. 20" X W. 16" Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment
           
The right image is a haunting self-portrait by Ernest Dreyfuss (1903-1977). Dreyfuss studied at the Frankfurt Art Institute with Ugi Battenberg and Max Beckman. He was interned in Buchenwald and later released in 1939. In 1941, he emigrated to the United States and settled in Chicago in the artist's colony at Kenwood and 57th streets. During a period following the Second World War, and lasting until the 1970's, the city of Chicago was altered in several ways under the heading "Urban Renewal." Unfortunately, this led to the demolishing of the area where the artist's colony was located. Dreyfuss feared that his existence was threatened again and was filled with traumatic memories of the war followed by feelings of guilt regarding his own survival. He developed severe depression and was finally committed to Chicago's Cook County Hospital. He died in 1977 at the age of 74. Note the warped stretcher on the easel. A symbol of his mental deterioration?

Ernest Dryefuss "Self-Portrait" 1948
H. 28" X W. 18" Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

After Treatment
           
           


           
192. These three oils are owned by the David and Alfred Smart Museum at the University of Chicago. The lower left landscape is by John Francis Murphy (1853-1921). Murphy first exhibited at the National Academy of Design in 1876. He became a member of the Society of American Artists in 1901. His chief characteristics are extreme refinement and charm, poetic sentiment, and beauty of surface. The lower right image is by Walter Sargent (1968-1927). Sargent was a painter, educator, and author. He was educated at Harvard University and later became a Professor of Art in the University of Chicago. He was also the author of The Enjoyment and Use of Color; How Children Learn to Draw, and Modeling in Public Schools. The right image is by Sarah Canright.

Sarah Canright "Untitled" ca. 1970
H. 48" X W. 60" After Treatment

J. Francis Murphy "Landscape" 1914
H.16" X W. 22" Before Treatment

Walter Sargent "November Twilight" 1911
H. 27" X W. 32" Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment
           
           


           
193. Paul-Desire Trouillebert (1829-1900) was born in Paris. Trouillebert began his artistic training in the studio of Auguste-Antoine-Ernest Hébert. Trouillebert debuted at the Paris Salon of 1865 and was chosen for every Salon from 1865 to 1872. He exhibited at least one portrait, there despite the fact that his interest had shifted primarily to landscape painting. Today, the artist's reputation is based upon his landscapes and his similarity to Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot. This links him closely to the other artists of the Barbizon School. The below landscape is layered with discolored varnish and will change dramatically after cleaning. The right image is attributed to Sir Joshua Reynolds (1723-1792). A Case Study on this painting reviews its historical context and treatment procedures. Both of these oils are owned by the Flint Institute of Arts, Flint, Michigan.
           

Paul Trouillebert "On the Seine, Normandy"
H. 25" X W. 32" Before Treatment

Sir Joshua Reynolds "Boy With a Drawing..."
H. 30
1/8" X. W. 25 1/8" Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

After Treatment
           
           


           
194. The lower paintings are owned by the Kenosha Public Museum in Kenosha, Wisconsin. Peter Bianchi was born in Kenosha in 1920. His early studies were carried out at the Mizen Academy of Art in Chicago, the Chicago Academy of Art and the American Academy of Art. While working on a project for National Geographic, on the Dead Sea Scrolls, Bianchi had the opportunity to experiment with scientific illustration. His work was so well received, he was invited to join the staff of the magazine and continued his work there for fourteen years. He collaborated with scientific specialists to illustrate Louis Leakey's great 1959 Tanzanian discovery of "Zinjanthropus." Peter Bianchi died in 2001. The right image is a memorial to the Tennessee Civil War General, George Thomas. The commemorative image lists his complete military career.
           

Peter Bianchi "Hohokum Bsllgame"
H. 11" X W. 21" After Treatment

"Memorial to General George Thomas"
H. 28" X W. 22" After Treatment
           
           


           
195. These three images are part of the collection of the DuSable Museum of African-American History in Chicago. The left and right images are by Ellis Wilson (1899-1977). His work can be found in the collections of many museums, including the Smithsonian's National Gallery of Art. He was born in Kentucky but moved to Chicago in 1918 to attend the School of the Art Institute. After graduation, he stayed in Chicago for five years before moving to New York in 1928. From 1935 to 1940, Ellis was employed by the government's Works Progress Administration Federal Arts Project. In 1944, Ellis was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship. In his own time, though, Ellis never quite managed to make a living at painting. When he died in 1977 in New York, he was buried in an unmarked pauper's grave. Its location today is unknown.
           
Charles Sebree (1914-1985) was one of many noted artists to emerge out of Chicago's black arts scene of the 1930s and 1940s. The network of support with such institutions as the South Side Community Arts Center and the Art Institute constituted a system through which black artists could forge a career. After attending the Art Institute of Chicago, Sebree interacted with a group of artists centered in Chicago's South Side. The vitality of Chicago's black arts movement came to rival that of Harlem, and Sebree benefited from the involvement. Sebree maintained a strong interest in the theater and often produced paintings of saltimbanques and harlequins. His below image is certainly reminiscent of this influence.
           

Ellis Wilson "Mask"
H. 12" X W. 9" Before

Charles Sebree "Lady Macbeth"
H. 24" X W. 20" Before

Ellis Wilson "Mask"
H. 14" X W. 12" Before
           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

after Treatment

After Treatment
           
           


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Barry Bauman Conservation
Contact: Mr. Barry Bauman
1122 N. Jackson Ave., River Forest, IL. 60305
Ph.(708)771-0382  Fax.(708)771-1532
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