2007
Participating Institutions
 
 
171. The DuSable Museum of African-American History, Chicago, has a vast and varied collection of major works by masters of the Chicago and Harlem Renaissance movements. These three paintings well represent some of the key individuals. The left image is by Ellis Wilson (1899-1977). His work can be found in the collections of many museums, including the Smithsonian's National Gallery of Art. He was born in Kentucky but moved to Chicago in 1918 to attend the School of the Art Institute. After graduation, he stayed in Chicago for five years before moving to New York in 1928. From 1935 to 1940, Ellis was employed by the government's Works Progress Administration Federal Arts Project. In 1944, Ellis was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship. Throughout 1944 and 1945, he produced a series of paintings capturing both the vitality and the quiet dignity of Southern black people. This oil entitled, "Street Scene" has a haunting Post-Depression feel and may date from the mid-30s.. In his own time, though, Ellis never quite managed to make a living at painting. When he died in 1977 in New York, he was buried in an unmarked pauper's grave. Its location today is unknown.

Ellis Wilson "Street Scene"
H. 12" X W. 15" Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

After Treatment
           

Charles Sebree "Woman with a Cup"
H. 10" X W. 8" Before Treatment
Charles Sebree (1914-1985) was one of many noted artists to emerge out of Chicago's black arts scene of the 1930s and 1940s. The network of support with such institutions as the South Side Community Arts Center and the Art Institute constituted a system through which black artists could forge a career. After attending the Art Institute of Chicago, Sebree interacted with a group of artists centered in Chicago's South Side. The vitality of Chicago's black arts movement came to rival that of Harlem, and Sebree benefited from the involvement. Sebree maintained a strong interest in the theater and often produced paintings of saltimbanques and harlequins. His below image is certainly reminiscent of Picasso's similar theme.
           

During Cleaning

After Treatment
           
One of America's most powerful African American painters, William H. Johnson (1901­1970) developed his talent along a path that took him from the southern United States to New York to Europe and back again. Born in South Carolina, he left the rural south when he was seventeen and moved to Harlem. He took odd jobs to save enough money to enter the art school of the National Academy of Design. When he completed the course of study there, Johnson's teacher and mentor, Charles Hawthorne, arranged financial assistance for the young artist to study in France. Johnson lived in Paris and on the southern coast of France for three years. He returned to New York in 1929, but a year later, moved to a small fishing village on the coast of Denmark. There he married a Danish artist, weaver Holcha Krake. Late in 1938, the couple returned to New York City. Johnson took a job teaching at the Harlem Community Arts Center. The move to New York marked a decisive shift in Johnson's art. Like his younger contemporaries Jacob Lawrence and Romare Bearden, Johnson began probing black experience, drawing his imagery from memories of life in the rural south as well as from the upbeat ambience of Harlem. After the death of his wife, he returned to South Carolina, but then decided to return to Denmark. Johnson's behavior had become increasingly strange, and soon thereafter he was diagnosed with a serious mental illness. He was sent back to New York and placed in a hospital, where he remained from 1947 until his death in 1970.

William. H. Johnson "I Baptize Thee"
H. 20
1/2 X W. 18" Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

After Treatment
           
           


           
172. John Neagle, portrait-painter, was born in Boston, Massachusetts on November 4, 1796. He began his career as an apprentice to a coach-painter, but he received some early lessons on painting from Bass Otis. In 1818 he determined to devote himself to portrait-painting, and moved to Lexington, Kentucky, and thence to Frankford, Louisville, and New Orleans, but returned to Philadelphia two years later. His first decided success was a portrait of the Reverend Dr. Joseph Pilmore, which is in St. George's hall, Philadelphia. In 1825 he painted his celebrated full-length portrait of Patrick Lyon, the blacksmith, at his forge, which is now in the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia. The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, owns his portrait of Gilbert Stuart. For several years before his death he had been unable to work, the result of a stroke from which he never recovered. Neagle was widely acclaimed in the prestigious Philadelphia art community that included Thomas Sully. Sully was actually Neagle's father-in-law, for he married Sully's daughter in 1820. John Neagle died in Philadelphia on September 17, 1865. The below portraits are owned by the Fairfield Heritage Association in Lancaster, Ohio. They depict the first owners of the famed "Georgian Mansion," a Federal home completed in 1832.
           

John Neagle "Portrait of Samuel Maccracken"
1824    H. 30" X W. 25" Before Treatment

John Neagle "Portrait of Sarah Maccracken"
1824    H. 30" X W. 25" Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment
           
           


           
173. Peter Bianchi was born in Kenosha, Wisconsin in 1920. His early studies were carried out at the Mizen Academy of Art in Chicago, the Chicago Academy of Art and the American Academy of Art. While working on a project for National Geographic, on the Dead Sea Scrolls, Bianchi had the opportunity to experiment with scientific illustration. His work was so well received, he was invited to join the staff of the magazine and continued his work there for fourteen years. He collaborated with scientific specialists to illustrate Louis Leakey's great 1959 Tanzanian discovery of "Zinjanthropus." Peter Bianchi died in 2001. The illustrated images are from his National Geographic series. The paintings are owned by the Kenosha public Museum, Kenosha, Wisconsin.
           

Peter Bianchi "Hohokum"  1988
H. 9" X W. 21" Before Treatment

Peter Bianchi "Hunters"   1961
H. 15
1/2" X W. 16" Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment
           
           


           
174. After completing six portraits for the Brunier Art Museum.at Iowa State University in Ames, the director decided to send in an additional three. All of these paintings are being prepared for an upcoming exhibit. The paintings represent past university Presidents and Deans.
           

Anon. "Port. of Charles Curtis"
H. 30" X W. 25" Before

Rossmann "Port. of A.W. Rudnick"
H. 30" X W. 25" Before

O. Hoffler "Port. of Ralph Bliss"
H. 30" X W. 25" Before
           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment

After Treatment
           
           


           
175. Dominican University, River Forest, Illinois owns several copies of major Italian paintings. This image, after Raphael, is part of their collection. The original painting is in the Uffizi Gallery in Florence. The painting was executed by one of the Sisters on the University's staff over one-hundred years ago.

           

During Cleaning

After Treatment
           
           


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Barry Bauman Conservation
Contact: Mr. Barry Bauman
1122 N. Jackson Ave., River Forest, IL. 60305
Ph.(708)771-0382  Fax.(708)771-1532
e-mail:barrybbc7@yahoo.com