2007
Participating Institutions
 
 
166. Leon Gaspard (1882-1964) was born in Vitebsk, near Moscow, into a family that nurtured his talents. By the age of fifteen he was taking art classes, and one of his fellow students was Marc Chagall. Seeking continued education, Gaspard studied art in Odessa and Moscow before he was able to enroll at the Julien Academy at the age of 17 where he studied with the great Bouguereau. The artist was severely wounded in the initial stages of World War I and sailed to New York in 1916 to join his American wife. He was advised to go to Santa Fe for his health. His extensive world travels are showcased in subjects American, European and Asian. The lower left image is typical of his vibrant palette and impressionistic style. The oil-on-canvas painting has been glued to a board support. The glue has dried unevenly and now the support is lifting and tearing. The image will be carefully removed from the board and remounted to an auxiliary support using a non-aqueous adhesive.
           

Leon Gaspard "Russie" 1914
H. 20" X W. 25
3/4" Before Treatment

Millard Sheets "Street People"
H. 40" X W. 50" Before Treatment
           
The right image is by Millard Sheets (1907-1989). Born, raised, and educated in southern California, Sheets studied at the Chouinard Art Institute, where he also began teaching while still a third-year student. During World War II he traveled to India and Burma as a war artist for Life magazine. From the late 1930s until 1955 he headed the art departments at Scripps College and Claremont Graduate School. His major commissions included murals for the Detroit Public Library, the dome of the National Shrine in Washington, D.C. and the Notre Dame University Library. His paintings are in major museums throughout America including the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Whitney Museum in New York, the Chicago Art Institute, the National Gallery in Washington D.C. and the Los Angeles County Museum. Both of these oils are owned by the David and Alfred Smart Museum of Art at the University of Chicago.
           

Lower Left Corner During Cleaning

Sky During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment
           
           


           
167. It is unusual when two paintings are brought in for treatment that have a curious historical link, but this is the case with the two pictured below. Both paintings are owned by the State Historical Society of Wisconsin, Madison. The left image is a portrait of Lyman C. Draper by John C. Merine (1821-1896). The portrait was commissioned in 1867 for the Society by a group of Draper's admirers. Draper was born in Evans, Erie County, New York on September 4, 1815. He was educated at common schools, the Hudson River seminary and at Granville College (now Denison University), Ohio. Draper was fascinated with history and spent years gathering artifacts and historical records. In October of 1852, he moved from Ohio to Madison. He served as state superintendent of public instruction from 1858 to 1859 and corresponding secretary (emeritus) for life. He was practically the founder of the State Historical Society and for thirty-two years its moving spirit. Lyman Draper died in Madison, on August 29, 1891.
           

John C. Merine "Portrait of Lyman C. Draper"
H. 30" X W. 25" Before Treatment

Robert Sully "Portrait of Nasheakusk"
H. 30" X W. 25" Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment
           
The right image is a portrait of Nasheakusk, the son of Black Hawk. The painting was executed by Robert M. Sully (1803-1855), the nephew of the great Thomas Sully, whose "Portrait of George Washington" is represented on Page 29. In 1854, Thomas Sully introduced Robert to Lyman Draper, and a lengthy written correspondence flourished. Draper envisioned a state art gallery within the Society in Madison to house the portraits of Wisconsin governors, Indian chiefs, senators, representatives, and early settlers, thus creating a visual record of the formation of early Wisconsin. In 1854, Draper asked many artists to send images of their paintings in exchange for honorary membership in the Society. This is precisely how the Society acquired the George Washington portrait.
           
Robert Sully replied to Draper's request by suggesting a painting tour of Wisconsin, proposing to paint the Black Hawk War battle grounds as historical documents. Draper answered by asking Sully to become the full-time Wisconsin State Historical Society artist. By promising official portraits to Wisconsin citizens, Draper raised enough money to bring Sully to Madison. On his 1855 trip to Madison, though, he unexpectedly died in Buffalo, New York. However, as a result of Sully's interest, the Society possesses a number of his works, including the Nasheakusk image. The painting was painted in 1833 when the sitter and his father were imprisoned at Fort Monroe, Virginia.
           
           


           

Karl Wirsum "Son of Sol Mascot"
H. 28" X W. 37" After Treatment
168. Designed in the beaux-arts style by the Boston firm Shepley, Rutan and Coolidge, the Chicago Cultural Center was completed in 1897 and dedicated as the city's Public Library. This remarkable building was inspired by the neo-classical style of the World's Columbian Exposition held in Chicago in 1893. A designated Chicago Landmark listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the building was reborn as the Chicago Cultural Center in 1991, when the Library relocated. The Cultural Center is now the home of the Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs. The Center will showcase the work of Chicago artist Karl Wirsum in a retrospective show in 2007. This piece was conserved for the Cultural Center as part of the comprehensive exhibit.
           
           


           
169. John Bloom is one of Davenport's most prestigious artists. He was born in DeWitt, Iowa in 1906. John's painting "Burial" won a prize in the 1932 Iowa Art Salon. The award and John's painting ability caught the attention of Grant Wood. Wood invited him to paint at the Stone City Art Colony that year. In 1932, the Depression was going on and John did not have the $40 for tuition. Grant Wood offered him a job as a groundskeeper, in lieu of tuition. In late 1937 John obtained a WPA contract to paint a mural for the DeWitt, Iowa post office. After completing the mural, "Shucking Corn," he was given another WPA contract to paint a mural for the Tipton, Iowa post office. The mural, "The Cattle," was a year-long project. At the age of 96, Bloom died in 2002. This oil is from the collection of Augustana College, Rock Island, Illinois.

John Bloom "Seining Minnows" 1938
H. 28" X W. 28" Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

After Treatment
           
           


           
170. The West Bend Museum of Art has sent in a remarkable nineteen painting for treatment over the last three years. The below oils represent two of their Wisconsin regionalist paintings. The museum is well-known for its outstanding collection of works by Carl von Marr. Today, the museum, under the direction of director, Tom Lidtke, is putting full force into establishing a museum of regional Wisconsin artists.
           

Gerrit Sinclair "Above the Dam" 1930
H. 25" X W. 31 " Before Treatment

Bernhard Schneider "Cedarburg, WI" 1894
H. 28" X W. 41" Before Treatment
           

Lower Right Corner During Cleaning

Sky During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment
           
           


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Barry Bauman Conservation
Contact: Mr. Barry Bauman
1122 N. Jackson Ave., River Forest, IL. 60305
Ph.(708)771-0382  Fax.(708)771-1532
e-mail:barrybbc7@yahoo.com