2006
Participating Institutions
 
 
151. The Brunier Art Museum at Iowa State University in Ames, Iowa has a vast and varied collection. As part of an upcoming exhibit in 2007, the University elected to conserve six portraits from its large portrait collection. The paintings represent past Presidents, Deans and Professors.
           

"Port. of Seaman Knapp" 1914
H. 25" X W. 21" Before

"Port. of Raymond Hughes" 1943
H. 36" X W. 30" Before

"Port. of Herman Knapp" 1935
H. 37" X W. 34" Before
           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment

After Treatment
           

"Port. of Charles Curtiss"
H. 40" X W. 30" Before

"Port. of B.W. Hammer" 1943
H. 36" X W. 30" Before

"Port. of Adonijah Welch"
H. 30" X 25" Before
           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment

After Treatment
           
           


           
152. Elmer Edward Taflinger (1891-1981), a native of Indianapolis, initially studied art under Otto Stark (1859-1926), He then studied for six years at the New York Art Students' League before being hired by stage producer David Belasco. His duties included designing costumes, sets, lighting, scouting plays, and casting. After leaving Belasco, Taflinger traveled in Europe before returning to New York City and re-entering the Art Students' League, He then moved to Indianapolis and taught at the Indianapolis Art League until 1965. A debilitating paralysis cut short his artistic career. The right image is a portrait of Sir Isaac Newton. Both works are owned by Purdue University.
           

Elmer Taflinger "Roughhouse"
H. 24" X W. 30" Before Treatment

Anon. "Portrait of Sir Isaac Newton"
H. 30" X W. 25" Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment
           
           


           
153. Peter Bianchi was born in Kenosha, Wisconsin in 1920. His early studies were carried out at the Mizen Academy of Art in Chicago, the Chicago Academy of Art and the American Academy of Art. While working on a project for National Geographic, on the Dead Sea Scrolls, Bianchi had the opportunity to experiment with scientific illustration. His work was so well received, he was invited to join the staff of the magazine and continued his work there for fourteen years. He collaborated with scientific specialists to illustrate Louis Leakey's great 1959 Tanzanian discovery of "Zinjanthropus." Peter Bianchi died in 2001. The right image is by John Goray. Both paintings are owned by the Kenosha Public Museum, Kenosha, Wisconsin.
           

Peter Bianchi "Zinjanthropus" 1960
H. 16" X W. 16" Before Treatment

John Goray "Salute"
H. 47" X W. 72" Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

 

After Treatment

After Treatement
           
           


           

Helen J. Hinrichsen "Davenport Centennial Mural: 1836-1936"
H. 96" X W. 360"
           
154. The Figge Art Museum, Davenport, Iowa is the owner of a 16-panel mural by Helen J. Hinrichsen (1896-1983). The title of the mural is the "Davenport Centennial Mural: 1836-1936." Former Curator of the Davenport Art Gallery, Ann C. Madonia, wrote a brochure on the artist and the mural's history. Her material will be quoted in four sections, as the mural will also be treated in four sections. The first narrative is in on Page 28.
           
The first step in the preparation of the mural was months of research into the history of the founding of Davenport, its subsequent development, and the lives of its leaders and people. As a result of her extensive research and knowledge of the early days of the City, Mrs. Hinrichsen was appointed to the 1936 Davenport Centennial Committee. Once the basic research was completed, Mrs. Hinrichsen decided upon the format of a continuous narrative to illustrate the first one-hundred years of Davenport's history. A series of drawings was created to visualize the subject in sequence, proportion, and scale. As work progressed on these drawings, the artist determined that she would need a mural eight feet high and thirty feet long. Finally, a finished painting was made, scaled three inches to the foot, as a working model for the actual mural.
           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           
Sufficient wall space to accommodate a work of this size was another problem to resolve. Since the artist wanted the mural to be accessible to the general public, she sought a location in downtown Davenport. After viewing several buildings, Mrs. Hinrichsen found the right location in the First National Building at Second and Main Streets. It was ground floor space that had belonged to a bank, but was then being remodeled for the first Walgreen's Drug Store in the area. The artist approached the Manager of the building, Paul Tornquist, and asked if he thought Walgreen's might be interestated in such a mural. Mr. Tornquist volunteered to take the matter up with the District Manager of Walgreen's. Shortly thereafter Mrs. Hinrichsen received word that the President of the firm, Charles R. Walgreen, wanted more details. In February 1936, she traveled to Chicago to discuss the project with him. After several weeks of anxious waiting, she received word that her commission had been accepted.
           
Since the mural had to be completed before July 1st, it was necessary to begin work immediately. Mr. Tornquist generously offered the artist some empty office space on one of the upper floors of the building and a makeshift studio was quickly set up. Mrs. Hinrichsen began a frantic work schedule of ten hours every day, seven days a week. Friends and relatives were called upon to pose as models for the figures portrayed. Two assistants were hired: John Bloom who made the necessary large-scale charcoal drawings; and Dickman Walker, who helped to prepare the mural surfaces and did some of the flat underpainting. The entire mural was to be painted on eight masonite panels, seven of which were eight feet high and four feet wide, with the remaining panel eight feet high and two feet wide. Since the mural was to be mounted on a wall that was grooved horizontally and vertically, the artist grooved the panels to match. Realizing that it might be necessary to remove the mural as some time in the future, Mrs. Hinrichsen had the murals mounted on a wooden support that, in turn, would be permanently attached to the wall. The panels could be easily removed from this wooden structure.
           
Another problem encountered was proper preparation of the masonite surface. Mrs. Hinrichsen wanted the panels to give as firm and as lasting a support to the paint as possible. She consulted with the manufacturer's chemist and upon his recommendation primed the masonite surface with a coat of aluminum paint, followed by a coat of white enamel undercoating as a ground for the oil paint. She consulted with Raymond Shiva, a chemist and noted consultant who had established the colors for all the buildings in the Chicago Centennial Exposition of 1933. Shiva specially prepared the oil paints to be used in the execution of the mural so the colors would be as permanent as possible. Once the preliminary problem of construction and material were solved, the actual painting of the mural began. Working from the scale model painting, a drawing was made of each figure and item in the panel. The drawing was transferred to tracing paper and, from that, to the panel. The finished scale painting was used as a model for the painting of the mural. Lastly, a thin coat of starch and water was applied to protect the paint surface.
           
           


           
155. After completing the Flint Institute of Art's Corot, Vlaminck, Hoppner and Jacque, the Director, Mr. John Henry, decided to send in two more paintings for treatment. The left image is attributed to Sir Thomas Lawrence (1769-1830). Lawrence was born in Bristol, England. He came to London in 1787, was received by Sir Joshua Reynolds, and became a student at the Royal Academy. He began to exhibit almost immediately, and his reputation increased so rapidly that he became an associate of the Academy in 1791. The death of Sir Joshua in 1792 opened the way to further successes. Lawrence was at once appointed principal painter to King George III in lieu of Reynolds. In 1794, he was a Royal Academician, and he became the fashionable portrait painter of the age. In 1815, he was knighted and in 1818 he went to Aachen to paint the sovereigns and diplomats gathered there for the third congress, and visited Vienna and Rome, everywhere receiving flattering marks of distinction from princes, due as much to his courtly manners as to his merits as an artist. After eighteen months, he returned to England, and on the very day of his arrival was chosen president of the Academy after Benjamin West, who had died a few days before. Lawrence held the office from 1820 to his death in 1830.
           
The right image is a portrait of Arthur Jerome Eddy, Jr. (1859-1920). To a generation of Chicagoans, Eddy was known as "the man that Whistler painted." I had the opportunity to treat the Whistler portrait while I was on staff at the Art Institute. Today, Eddy is remembered for the daring purchases he made in 1913 at the Armory Show, the controversial exhibition of Modern art that debuted in New York and was then shown at The Art Institute of Chicago. Eddy not only purchased but championed Modern art through lectures and in publications, the best known of which was Cubists and Post-Impressionism.
           

Sir Thomas Lawrence "Port. of Eliz. Williams
H. 16" X W. 16" Before Treatment

Anon. "Portrait of Arthur Jerome Eddy Jr."
H. 23
1/2" X W. 19 1/2" Before Treatment

           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment
           
           


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Barry Bauman Conservation
Contact: Mr. Barry Bauman
1122 N. Jackson Ave., River Forest, IL. 60305
Ph.(708)771-0382  Fax.(708)771-1532
e-mail:barrybbc7@yahoo.com