2006
Participating Institutions
 
 
146. A key figure in the development of the Brown County, Indiana artist colony, Adolph Robert Shulz (1869 - 1963) arrived there in 1900 and is generally considered to be the "father" of that group of painters. He is known for his landscapes but also did portraiture. He was born in Delavan, Wisconsin and studied at the Art Institute of Chicago, the Art Students League in New York and with William Merritt Chase. He returned to Delavan many summers to paint. Around 1900, he began trips to Nashville, Indiana, and he eventually moved there with his family in 1917. From 1925 to 1942, he exhibited at the Hoosier Salon and also at the Art Institute of Chicago. The right image is by T.C. Steele, an artist well documented throughout this site.
           

Adolph Robert Shulz "Haunt of the Muskrat"
H. 38" X W. 48" After Treatment

T.C. Steele "Winding Road"
H. 30" X W. 45" Before Treatment
           

 

Steele "Winding Road" During Cleaning

Steele "Winding Road" During Cleaning
           
 

After Treatment
 
           
George Winter (1809-1876) was born in England. He frequented London's museums and galleries as a young man but apparently received no formal training in art. In 1830, Winter emigrated to New York where he studied for a short time at the National Academy of Design. In 1837, he arrived by stagecoach in the frontier town of Logansport, Indiana, coming, as he said, "..to the Wabash for the purpose...of seeing and learning something of the Indians and exercising the pencil in the (sic.) direction." During his lifetime, Winter documented a vanishing culture. He obtained the confidence of the Miami and Potawatomi Indians and had unique opportunities to sketch them as an artist, but, like an historian, he kept accurate records and wrote prolifically about his paintings and the subjects and circumstances of his works. These four paintings are owned by the Indiana State Museum and represent a total of thirty-two paintings conserved for the museum over the last three years.
           

George Winter "Spotted Fawn"
H. 21" X W. 17" Before Treatment

T.C. Steele "16th Street--Winter Morning"
H. 22" X W. 27" After Treatment
           

Winter "Spotted Fawn" During Cleaning

Winter "Spotted Fawn" During Cleaning
           
 

After Treatment
 
           
           


           
147. The West Bend Art Museum, West Bend, Wisconsin is the owner of these two works of art. The museum has the finest collection of works by Carl von Marr and also collects works by Wisconsin regionalist artists. The left image is by Wilhelm Schroeter (1849-1904) while the right is by Friedrich W. Heine (1845-1921). Both artists, with German heritage, settled in Wisconsin and are known for their landscape abilities.
           

Wilhelm Schroeter "Winter Landscape" 1889
H. 30" X W. 21" Before Treatment

Friedrich W. Heine "Clark's Bluff" 1920
H. 12" X W. 18" Before Treatment

           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment
           
           


           
148. This wonderful portrait seems to capture the essence of the sitter. The brushstroking is open and free, reminiscent of a western style at the time. The painting is owned by the Hinsdale Historical Society, Hinsdale, Illinois.and was painted by Hugh W. Ditzler (1870-1949). Ditzler began his art training at the Art Institute of Chicago, although he frequently traveled to Paris to study at the Academie Julian. While a competent draftsman, Ditzler was keenly interested in iron-work and from 1920 on he devoted himself entirely to this discipline. One of his larger projects was the ornamental iron-work for the Williamsburg, Virginia, restoration program. This portrait has been torn in the cheek area and is highly discolored from dirt and aged varnish.

Hugh Ditzler "Portrait of Jack Donkin"   ca. 1880
H. 21" X W. 14" Before Treatment

           

During Cleaning

After Treatment
           
           


           

Homer Davisson "Along the Trail"
H. 25" X W. 30" Before Treatment

149. Indiana Impressionist landscape painter Homer G. Davisson (1866-1957), studied at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia; Art Students League, New York City; and the Corcoran School of Art, Washington, D.C. He exhibited, primarily pastoral landscapes, at the Hoosier Salon, Swope Art Gallery, Fort Wayne Art Museum, and the Indiana Artists' Club. From 1920, Davisson regularly summered in Nashville, Indiana, where he became a charter member of the Brown County Art Gallery Association in 1926. His haunting "Self-Portrait" was earlier reviewed on this site.
           

During Cleaning

After Treatment
           
           


           
150. One of the great Chicago African-American artists was William Edouard Scott (1884-1964). He was born in Indianapolis and studied at the Art Institute of Chicago where he received early training as a muralist. After further study in Paris at the Académie Julian and with Henry Ossawa Tanner, Scott returned to Chicago where he painted numerous portraits and murals. In 1931, he traveled to Haiti where he was an artist in residence under a Julius Rosenwald Fellowship. I have had the pleasure of overseeing the conservation all of his surviving murals in Chicago, including works at Shoop Elementary School, Lane Technical College Preparatory School and the Wabash YMCA. His great murals at Chicago's Pilgrim Baptist Church were destroyed last year in a devastating fire which gutted the entire building. The left image is drawn from his Haitian period while the two right images are by one of his great teachers, Henry Ossawa Tanner (1859-1937). The Art Institute of Chicago owns Tanner's haunting "Self-Portrait" while his American icon, "The Banjo Lesson " is in the collection of the Huntington Memorial Library in Hampton, Virginia. Tanner initially studied with Thomas Eakins at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts in Philadelphia. In 1891 he moved to Paris where he studied at the Académie Julian. His "Resurrection of Lazarus" won the gold medal at the Salon of 1897 and was later purchased by the French government. Tanner died in Étaples, Normandy, France in 1937. These three oils are owned by the DuSable Museum of African-American History, Chicago, Illinois.
           

William Scott "Flower Girl"
H.21" X W. 14" Before

H. Tanner "Death Pursuing Youth"
1894    H. 12" X W. 16" Before

Henry Tanner "Landscape"
H. 16" X W. 9" Before

           

After Treatment

After Treatment

After Treatment
           
           


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Barry Bauman Conservation
Contact: Mr. Barry Bauman
1122 N. Jackson Ave., River Forest, IL. 60305
Ph.(708)771-0382  Fax.(708)771-1532
e-mail:barrybbc7@yahoo.com