2006
Participating Institutions
 
 
141. The Cathedral Museum in Fort Wayne, Indiana is the owner of these two "Adoration Scenes." Both paintings are coated with two distinct films. A dirt and grime layer is resting on top of a discolored varnish. These layers are masking the original color relationships and flattening the three-dimensional quality of the scenes. The cleaning change will be quite dramatic. The paintings are unsigned.
           

Anon. "Adoration Scene"
H. 24
1/2" X W. 32 1/2" Before Treatment

Anon. "Adoration Scene"
H. 24
1/2" X W. 32 1/2" Before Treatment

           

Madonna's Hand/Robe During Cleaning

Madonna's Robe During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment
           
           

           
142. The Illinois State Museum, Springfield, Illinois is the owner of these four paintings. The upper two are by one of the most influential artists in Chicago's art history, Rudolph Weisenborn (1881-1974). Weisenborn set the foundation for Chicago's early Modernism movement. It is unfortunate that a studio fire in 1922 destroyed almost all of his early drawings and paintings. His work combined both European Cubist and Expressionist influences with American Precisionism as seen in the work of Charles Sheeler. Weisenborn clashed with the established art scene in Chicago that routinely held juried art exhibitions. In 1922, he founded the Chicago No-Jury Society of Artists with Raymond Johnson, Carl Hoeckner and Ramon Shiva . The underlying premise of the society was, that "freedom from juries gives the artist liberty to develop individual ideas." (Taken from 2nd Annual Show Catalog, 1923) Weisenborn went on to become a WPA artist. His visionary work far exceeded the repetitious formulas consistent throughout most of the WPA work in Chicago. His mural, "Contemporary Chicago," at the Nettelhorst Elementary School, is the most important WPA mural in Chicago. I had the honor of treating the painting in 1997.
           

Rudolph Weisenborn "Chicago" 1926
H. 47" X W. 79" Before Treatment

Rudolph Weisenborn "Thunderhead Mountain"
1958   H. 24" X W. 30" Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment

           
Carl Hoeckner (1883-1972) was one of the other founders of the Chicago No-Jury Society of Artists. He was born in Munich, Germany and trained in Hamburg and Cologne. Hoeckner began his early work as an artist in Munich where he illustrated for magazines and was trained as a lithographer. After arriving in America in 1910, he worked in Chicago at Marshall Field's department store in their advertising department. Becoming increasingly political and protesting of war, as a result of World War I, he painted a piece called "War", which was exhibited in 1918 at the Architectural League, New York. His "The Homecoming of 1918", shows a crowd of gaunt, wounded people with nightmarish expressions marching toward the viewer and their death . The shown painting embraces his revulsion of war as depicted by the grotesque image of an out-of control dancer surrounded by the wounded and the war lords. The right image is by Leopold Seyffert (1887-1956). He was mentioned on the previous page as having studied with William Merritt Chase. Seyffert was a highly successful artist, painting portraits, influenced by his Spanish travels, of the social elite. The depicted image shows a blanched surface caused by remnants of former cleaning solutions.
           

Carl Hoeckner "Gold in the Century of Progress"
1933   H. 39
1/2" X W. 29 1/2" Before Treatment

Leopold Seyffert "A Model" 1921
H. 42" X W. 45" Before Treatment
           

Detail Leg During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment
           
           


           
143. Ralph Albert Blakelock (1847-1919) is arguably one of America's most important landscape artists and yet he led a life that would not be envied. He was born in New York and at the young age of twenty-two he set out to cross America and paint the great West. He traveled across the Rockies and went all the way to California painting the western landscape, Indians and the great American wilderness. After three years, he returned to New York and offered his canvases for sale but the images, unfamiliar to the Eastern eye, were met with disdain. He had great troubles supporting his wife and family. He was always moving and always hoping for a monetary breakthrough. He spiraled into depression and was eventually found insane. At the end of his life he was living in a New York State asylum as his paintings were selling for up to $20,000.00.
           
The market for western landscapes had taken off; Bierstadt, Cole and Church brought great awareness of the open American West and, as a result, a diverse market of forged Blakelocks were being sold. Authenticity is critical and in 1969 the University of Nebraska, under the direction of the Art Director Norman Geske, set out to produce a definitive catalog of Blakelock's work. The below painting received his highest rating, a "Category #1" designation. This important work is owned by the Massillon Museum, Massillon, Ohio.
           

Ralph Albert Blakelock "California Woods"
1869     H. 36
1/2" X W. 56 1/4" Before Treatment

Detail Signature Lower Right
           

Upper Sky During Cleaning

After Treatment
           
           


           

144. This oil-on-canvas portrait is of Dr. J. C. Corbus, Sr. He was born September 30th, 1833 in Millersburg, Ohio and received his doctorate degree from Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. He moved to Mendota, Illinois in 1855 shortly after receiving his degree. In 1862, he was appointed Assistant Surgeon of the Seventy-Fifth Illinois Infantry but, ironically, he was forced to resign and leave the service in 1863 due to ill health,.

His experiences in the army, though, did include some of the severest battles of the Civil War, Perryville and Stone River. He was taken prisoner during the battle of Stone River. Upon his release he relocated in Mendota and built up a large and lucrative practice, residing there until his death in 1909. The oil portrait is owned by the Mendota Museum & Historical Society, Mendota, Illinois. The surface has been mold stained and will require careful cleaning to return the intended appearance.

(S?) Small "Portrait of J.C.Corbus Sr."
H.25" X 19" Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

After Treatment
           
           


           
145. These charming portraits were brought in for treatment by the Art Gallery of Northern Illinois University, Dekalb, Illinois. The portraits depict Edwin Wilson Hutter (1813-1873) and his wife Elizabeth (b.1821). The images may have been commissioned for their wedding which took place in 1838. Hutter was the owner of two newspapers in Allentown, Pennsylvania. He also became a private secretary to secretary of state, James Buchanan. The unsigned portraits show a strong English influence and were carried out by an artist who may have trained or studied in Europe.
           

Unsigned "Portrait of Edwin Wilson Hutter"
ca. 1838   H. 30" X W. 25" Before Treatment

Unsigned "Portrait of Elizabeth Hutter"
ca. 1838   H. 30" X W. 25" Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment

           
           


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Barry Bauman Conservation
Contact: Mr. Barry Bauman
1122 N. Jackson Ave., River Forest, IL. 60305
Ph.(708)771-0382  Fax.(708)771-1532
e-mail:barrybbc7@yahoo.com