2006
Participating Institutions
 
 
136. The Flint Institute of Arts, under the directorship of John B. Henry, is one of Michigan's unique jewel museums. The institution is naturally effected by the state's economic reliance on the auto industry. The advantage of complimentary conservation services has allowed the museum to continue to offer collection care. The four paintings brought in for treatment well testify to the quality of the museum's collection.
           
The left image is by Jean-Baptiste Camille Corot (1796-1875). Corot's work formed a bridge between the traditional classical format of the 1800's and the romantic movement which eventually led to Impressionism. In 1825, he went to Italy to study, his work largely influenced by Claude Lorrain and Nicolas Poussin. On returning to France in 1828, he came under the influence of the painters in Barbizon. His landscape works appear to be seen through a soft veil, that offers the viewer an ability to not only witness the landscape, but serves as a welcoming invitation to participate. The painting's treatment will correct the harsh surface cracks, now visually disturbing and robbing the painting of its intended tonal flow.
           
Corot's influence on other Barbizon painters is easily seen in the works of Charles-Emile Jacque (1813-1894). Jacque was born in France but in 1836 he traveled and studied in England. After two years, he returned to France and worked with Millet. He is largely known today for his animal studies and bucolic landscapes. His work is represented in all major museums including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York and the National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C.
           

Jean-Baptiste Corot "Landscape with Figures"
H. 17
7/8" X W. 25 3/4" Before Treatment

Charles Emile Jacque "The Shepherdess"
H. 15
3/8" X W. 23 3/4" Before Treatment
           

Corot Sky During Cleaning

Jacque During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment
           
The two lower images contrast sharply with the above landscapes. The left painting is by Maurice de Vlaminck (1876-1958). In his early career, Vlaminck was both a professional violinist and a cyclist. It was later that he met André Derain and thereafter worked exclusively as a painter. The depicted strange scene is highlighted by the gray palette and the awkward, unbalanced architectural composition. A fitting counterpoint is the beautiful, serene portrait, on the right, by John Hoppner (1758-1810). As a boy, Hoppner entered the Royal Academy in London. In 1778, he took a silver medal for drawing, and, in 1782, the Academy's highest award, the gold medal for historical painting. His earliest love was for landscapes, but necessity, à la Sargent, obliged him to turn to the more lucrative business of portrait painting. He is best known today for his portraits in the state apartments at St. James's Palace, the best perhaps being those of the prince of Wales, the duke and duchess of York, Lord Rodney and Lord Nelson.
           

Maurice de Vlaminck "Landscape with a Church"
H. 28
3/4" X W. 21 1/4" Before Treatment

John Hoppner "Miss Mercer Eliphinstone"
H. 22
5/8" X W. 181/2" Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment
           
           


           
137. The Oshkosh Public Museum has the finest collection of artifacts and archival materials in the Lake Winnebago Region. The collection is owned by the City of Oshkosh and represents a wide range of holdings. The museum was founded in 1924. The institution has such diverse items as Chief Oshkosh's famous hat, Civil War uniforms and original muskets, textiles, quilts, and historical photographs. These two paintings are a part of the permanent collection. The left image is monogrammed CM and is dated 1875. The right, 1885 image, is by Edmund Osthaus (1858 - 1928). Born in Germany, Osthaus studied at the Dusseldorf Academy until 1882. He moved to the United States in 1883 to teach and become Director of the Toledo Academy of Fine Arts. After leaving teaching, he followed dog and sporting events and became one of the most noted canine painters.
           

CM "Pioneer Scene" 1875
H. 22" X W. 36" Before Treatment

Edmund Osthaus "Boy with Dogs" 1885
H. 36" X W. 48" Before Treatment
           

Sky/Mountain During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment
           
           


           
138. Illinois has several hidden jewels. One of these is the Oregon Township Public Library. Following the Columbian Exposition in 1893, a core group of artists decided to remain in the Chicago area. Their desire was to escape the city in favor of an artistic retreat. Wallace Heckman, a Chicago attorney, offered the use of his summer estate in Oregon, Illinois under an unusual lease that ran for as long as one of the founding members was alive. In 1898 the Eagle's Nest Art Colony was born. Sculptor Lorado Taft and the painters Charles Francis Brown and Oliver Dennett Grover were three of the founding members. Included in the core group was John Thomas Nolf (1871-1950). He originally studied at the Art Institute of Chicago and exhibited throughout his career at the Pennsylvania Academy, the San Francisco Museum, the National Academy and the Art Institute of Chicago. This provocative painting examines a contemplative moment for an aged woman. The Eagle's Nest Art Colony remained intact until 1942 with the death of its last surviving member, Ralph Clarkson.

John Thomas Nolf "The Last Leaf"
H. 28" X W. 28" Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

After Treatment

           
           


           

William Merritt Chase "Red Snappr and Still Life"
ca. 1900    H. 29" X 36" Before Treatment
139. Another Illinois jewel is the collection of Augustana College in Rock Island. A brilliant book, Origins of Modernity, was published in 2005 and features many of the fine works in the collection including paintings by Corot, Boudin, de Chiico and the pictured, William Merritt Chase (1849-1916). Born in Indiana, Chase quickly inclined to the arts. In 1878, he went to Europe and studied at the Academy of Fine Arts in Munich. He studied under Alexander Von Wagner and Karl von Piloty, and befriended American artists Walter Shirlaw and Frank Duveneck. In Munich, Chase employed his rapidly burgeoning talent most often in figurative works that he painted in the loosely-brushed style popular with his instructors. Chase traveled to Venice, Italy in 1877 with Duveneck and John Henry Twachtman before returning to the United States in the summer of 1878. He quickly became an important artist on the American scene and groomed other artists through his extraordinary teaching skills. His students included George Bellows, Georgia O'Keeffe, Rockwell Kent, Charles Sheeler, Lawton Parker, Louis Ritman, Leopold Seyffert and Frederic Grant.
           

During Cleaning

After Treatment
           
           


           
140. The Spertus Museum of Judaica has an outstanding collection of fine art as well as ceremonial artifacts. The left oil is by Todros Geller (1889-1949). Geller was born in the Ukraine of Russia. In 1906, when he was seventeen years old, he immigrated with his family to Montreal, Canada. There he studied art, married and then moved to Chicago in 1918. He continued his art studies at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and became a leading artist within the city's art community. He was a source of inspiration to others, including Aaron Bohrod and Mitchell Siporin. Geller's works are in the collections of the Art Institute of Chicago, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York, and the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. The beautiful right image is only monogrammed "C.J." and depicts a rather mysterious and solemn synagogue interior.
           

Todros Geller "Crossroads" ca. 1930
H. 32" X W. 28" Before Treatment

C.J. "Altneu Synagogue, Prague" 1868
H. 42" X W. 31
1/2" Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment
           
The lower left image is by Saul Raskin (1878-1966). At the age of 15, Raskin studied lithography in Odessa and later attended art academies in Germany, France, Italy and Switzerland. After migrating to the US in 1904, he became a multifaceted artist and produced etchings, paintings, and watercolors. The lower right painting is by Ernest Dreyfuss (1903-1977). Dreyfuss studied at the Frankfurt Art Institute with Ugi Battenberg and Max Beckman. He was interned in Buchenwald and later released in 1939. In 1941, he emigrated to the United States and settled in Chicago in the artist's colony at Kenwood and 57th streets. During a period following the Second World War, and lasting until the 1970's, the city of Chicago was altered in several ways under the heading "Urban Renewal." Unfortunately, this led to the demolishing of the area where the artist's colony was located. Dreyfuss feared that his existence was threatened again and was filled with traumatic memories of the war followed by feelings of guilt regarding his own survival. He developed severe depression and was finally committed to Chicago's Cook County Hospital. He died at the age of 74, in 1977.
           

Saul Raskin "Rachel's Tomb"
H. 30" X W. 49" Before Treatment

Ernest Dreyfuss "The Afflicted" 1951
H. 40" X W. 22" Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment

           
           


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Barry Bauman Conservation
Contact: Mr. Barry Bauman
1122 N. Jackson Ave., River Forest, IL. 60305
Ph.(708)771-0382  Fax.(708)771-1532
e-mail:barrybbc7@yahoo.com