2006
Participating Institutions
 
 
126. These three oil paintings are owned by the Philbrook Museum of Art, Tulsa, Oklahoma. Felix Ziem was born in France on the 26th of February, 1821. Originally he studied to be an architect at the School of Architecture in Dijon. In 1842, he traveled to Italy and visited Rome and Venice, which was to become the principal subject of his later paintings. Ziem exhibited for the first time at the Paris Salon in 1849 and remained a frequent exhibitor there until 1868, with Constantinople and Venice as his favorite subjects. He also taught and, surprisingly, in 1864 Princess (later Queen) Victoria was one of his pupils. He resumed exhibiting regularly at the Salon from 1888, with a much more impressionist style, concentrating on dramatic skies full of color and light. He received numerous honors and medals for his work and was awarded the Chevalier of the Legion of Honour in 1857. He died in Paris on the 10th of November, 1911, leaving part of the contents of his studio to the City of Paris. His work was highly collected by Mrs. Isabella Stuart Gardner whose museum holds numerous etchings and paintings from his hand. The left image well represents his quintessential Venetian subject matter.
           
The center image is by Samuel Bell Waugh. Waugh was born in Mercer, Pennsylvania in 1814. His early interest in art carried him to Europe to study painting on his own, spending eight years traveling between France, Italy and England. He spent his time studying the techniques of light, color, composition and style of the old masters. When he returned to the States, he settled in Philadelphia and became a popular portrait artist, even painting portraits of Abraham Lincoln and Ulysses S. Grant. Waugh was a member of the National Academy of Design and the Artists' Fund Society. He was from a family of successful artists; his wife Mary Eliza Young Waugh, his son Frederick Judd Waugh, his daughter Ida Waugh and his nephew Henry W. Waugh were all painters. Samuel Waugh died in Janesville, Wisconsin in 1885. Works by his son Frederick are represented in the 2005 inventory on Page 22 in a painting also owned by the Philbrook Museum of Art and on Page 15 in a painting owned by the The Harry S. Truman National Historic Site, National Park Service, Independence, Missouri. The right image is by William Keith (1839-1911).
           

F. Ziem "Venetian Scene"
H. 13 X W. 13" Before

Sam Waugh "Port. of Mary Ross"
1848     H. 36 X W. 29" Before

W. Keith "California Landscape"
H. 24" X W. 36" Before
           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment

After Treatment
           
           


           
127. The West Bend Art Museum in West Bend, Wisconsin is one of the State's hidden jewels. With a varied collection, it is primarily known for housing the work of Carl von Marr (1858-1936). Born in Germany, von Marr exhibited at the Columbian Exposition in 1894. The museum owns over 300 of his works including the pictured "Thou Ring Upon Thy Finger". The oil is typical of his works displaying his solid academic drawing and awareness of how every detail of a picture can be used to unfold the narrative. The picture's subject is a betrothal. Marr has positioned the couple so that the maiden is drawn into her fiance's embrace, symbolic of their union. Our voyeur moment is secure as the couple's gaze is targeted on the ring. A truly wonderful painting.
           
The left image is by Thomas H. Stevenson. The English-born artists Samuel Marsden Brookes and Thomas H. Stevenson moved to America and met in Chicago. In 1855, the pair opened a studio in Milwaukee and worked together on portrait and landscape oils. Collaboration on paintings is unusual but each brought an artistic strength. Brookes excelled as a portraitist and Stevenson as a landscapist. Here, Stevenson signed the verso, "Painted by T.H. Stevenson. Little Elkhart Lake Sheboygan Co. Wis." A collaborative piece by Brookes and Stevenson can be seen on Page 26.
           

Carl von Marr "Thou Ring Upon Thy Finger"
ca. 1895    H. 35" X W. 35" Before Treatment

Thomas H. Stevenson "Little Elkhart Lake..."
1874    H. 12 " X 18" After Treatment
           

Male Sleeve During Cleaning

After Treatment
           
           


           
128. These four paintings represent the extensive and varied collection of the South Bend Regional Museum of Art, South Bend, Indiana. The left image is by George Henry Bogert (1864-1944). Born in New York City, Bogert was an American landscape painter. As a student, he studied at at the National Academy of Design and under Thomas Eakins. In 1884 he went to France and studied with Chavannes. After four years, he returned to New York, although in summer journeys abroad, he painted at Etaples on the French coast with Eugène Boudin. He received gold medal honors from the American Society of Arts in 1902 and 1907.
           
The right image is by Alexis Jean Fournier(1865-1948). Born in St. Paul, Minnesota, Fournier was one of the most prolific 19th-Century landscape artists. Greatly influenced by the Barbizon painters, his work pays homage to his artistic mentors.
           

George Bogert "Venetian Moonlight"
H. 20" X W. 30" Before Treatment

Alexis Fournier "Kiss of Autumn"
H. 17" x w. 21" Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment

           
The two lower images are by William Keith (1838-1911). Keith is well represented throughout this site including the upper painting owned by the Philbrook Museum of Art and an earlier piece owned by the Phoenix Art Museum. A native of Scotland, William Keith became in the late 19th and early 20th centuries a leading Northern California landscape artist, known as the "Dean of California painters." In 1863, he studied with Samuel Marsden Brooks. Keith completed thousands of paintings and drawings. Many of them were lost in his studio fire of 1906. During the winter of 1871 he lived in Boston, but soon went to Europe where he studied portrait painting in Munich with J. Frank Currier and, interestingly, with Carl von Marr who is also represented on this page in a work owned by the West Bend Museum of Art.
           
Keith returned to America and then settled for the remainder of his life in Berkeley, California. In 1891, he shared his studio for several weeks with George Inness. Among the locations where Inness and Keith painted together were Monterey and Yosemite. Under Inness' influence, Keith painted in a Barbizon-influenced vein. By the early 1900s, he was one of the wealthiest artists in the United States. People from all over the world sought out his studio. He died April 13, 1911.
           

William Keith "Impressionistic Romantic Landscape"
H. 18" X W. 24" Before Treatment

William Keith "Pasture with Trees"
H. 16" X W. 24" Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment

           
           


           

129. The two below paintings were created by William Bradford (1823-1892). Bradford was born and raised in New Bedford, Massachusetts. In the early 1850s, he launched his professional career by selling portraits of ships for twenty-five dollars. In 1854, he opened a studio and attracted the interest of Albert Van Beest, a Dutch painter who had come to America in 1845. He became Bradford's teacher and collaborator, and until his death in 1860, they painted local scenes including seascapes and whaling pictures.

In 1861, Bradford began a series of trips to Nova Scotia, Labrador, and Greenland. He published a book in London titled "The Arctic Region," which he also illustrated. In the early 1880s, he lectured on the Arctic in England and even received a commission for painting Queen Victoria. In the 1870s, he sailed to America and established a studio in San Francisco. He traveled extensively in the western United States where he painted Yosemite, Mariposa Valley, and the mountains of the Sierra Nevada. He often traveled and painted with Albert Bierstadt.

These paintings are typical of his marine scenes painted with atmospheric tones, expressive cloud formations, and subtle gradations of tone. The lyric red hues of the right image is a breathtaking example of his virtuoso capabilities.

           


William Bradford
"Afternoon Near Cape St. John, Labrador"
H. 20" X W. 30" Before Treatment

William Bradford
"Leaving the Arctic Ice Fields
Under the Midnight Sun"
H. 20" X W. 30" Before Treatment
           
The oils are on display at Montauk, the historic site that is former Iowa Governor William Larrabee's residence. Larrabee was Iowa's 12th Governor. His Italianate mansion of brick and native limestone was built in 1874. Montauk sits on a hill about 200 feet higher than the town of Clermont which is about a mile to the south. It's an imposing 14-room brick and stone house in a grassy clearing surrounded by 100,000 trees.
           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           
One of the Larrabee's daughters lived in the house until she passed away in 1965 at the age of 96. The family opened the house to the public in the fall of 1967. They maintained ownership until 1976 when, the contents and 40 acres were deeded to the state of Iowa as a historical site. The State Historical Society of Iowa preserves Montauk which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
           

After Treatment

After Treatment

           
           


           
130. The Figge Art Museum, Davenport, Iowa is the owner of a 16-panel mural by Helen J. Hinrichsen (1896-1983). The title of the mural is the "Davenport Centennial Mural: 1836-1936." Former Curator of the Davenport Art Gallery, Ann C. Madonia, wrote a brochure on the artist and the mural's history. Her material will be quoted in three sections, as the mural will also be treated in three sections.
           
Helen Johnson was born in Springfield, Illinois, but grew up in Chicago. She graduated from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago where she met John Steuart Curry. She also studied at the Art Students League in New York City and at the Stone City Art Colony in Iowa taught by Grant Wood. Through Wood, she became acquainted with Thomas Hart Benton. She later returned to teach at the Art Institute. In 1923, she married Fred A. Hinrichsen in Chicago and the couple eventually moved to Davenport, Iowa. Mrs. Hinrichsen exhibited at the Art Institute of Chicago; the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts in Philadelphia; the Whitney Museum in New York City; Brown University in Rhode Island; and in numerous regional and national exhibitions.
           
She was the recipient of numerous awards, including an Honorable Mention from the Art Institute of Chicago, and her works are included in public and private collections throughout the United States. She was an active member of the Davenport Art Gallery and was the Past President and Life Member of the Friends of Art. Helen Johnson Hinrichsen was professionally active until shortly before her death.
           

Helen J. Hinrichsen "Davenport Centennial Mural: 1836-1936"
H. 96" X W. 360"
           
One of the most significant paintings in the collection of the (then) Davenport Art Gallery is the Centennial Mural of 1936 illustrating the first one-hundred years of Davenport's civic history. The concept of a mural to commemorate the centennial of the City of davenport originating with a local artist, Helen Johnson Hinrichsen (1896-1983). Although the federal government sponsored many commissions for murals during the Depression Era of the 1930s, the artist assumed this project on her own. "Many people thought it was a government project," she said, "but the government had nothing to do with it. It was a private commission."
           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           
The first step in the preparation of the mural was months of research into the history of the founding of Davenport, its subsequent development, and the lives of its leaders and people. As a result of her extensive research and knowledge of the early days of the City, Mrs. Hinrichsen was appointed to the 1936 Davenport Centennial Committee. Once the basic research was completed, Mrs. Hinrichsen decided upon the format of a continuous narrative to illustrate the first one-hundred years of Davenport's history. A series of drawings was created to visualize the subject in sequence, proportion, and scale. As work progressed on these drawings, the artist determined that she would need a mural eight feet high and thirty feet long. Finally, a finished painting was made, scaled three inches to the foot, as a working model for the actual mural.
           

This narrative will be continued as further sections of the mural are treated.
           


Home, Page 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29

 





Barry Bauman Conservation
Contact: Mr. Barry Bauman
1122 N. Jackson Ave., River Forest, IL. 60305
Ph.(708)771-0382  Fax.(708)771-1532
e-mail:barrybbc7@yahoo.com