2006
Participating Institutions
 
 
116. In 1908, Dorothy Loeb was one of five School of the Art Institute students commissioned by Kate Buckingham and her Chicago Public School Art Society to create murals for the new Albert G. Lane Technical High School located at Division and Sheffield. Loeb and the other four artists --Henry George Brandt, Margaret Hittle, William E. Scott, and George Stevenson --painted a total of eleven murals on site at Lane between 1909 and 1913. Loeb's 78" x 200" untitled oil on canvas, completed in 1909, graced the stage of the school's auditorium for many years. While the mural had no official title, it was referred to in various student publications as "A Study in Primitive Forge," and it depicted a group of tool-bearing workers gathered around a cauldron into which molten metal was being poured.
           
By 1934, Lane was overcrowded with students and moved to its larger (and present) location on Addison and Western. Over the years, its beautiful art collection had deteriorated and from 1995-1998, I completed the first stage of its Mural Restoration Project which included an auditorium fire curtain, and 10 of the original eleven Chicago Public School Art Society murals. Everyone just assumed that the Loeb mural had not survived the 1934 move, but Flora Doody, director of Lane's Mural Preservation Project, was still curious. Upon further research, she discovered photos of the mural in Lane Tech yearbooks that dated from 1936 to 1952. The painting had been hanging in Room 113, but in the early 1950s, it was replaced with a photomural of Chicago.
           
The Loeb mural was lost for over 50 years. Its discovery and unveiling was documented in three separate newspaper articles. (Chicago Tribune Article, Chicago Sun-Times Article, Chicago Journal Article). This year's Introduction to Fine Art Conservation course at Lane Tech will focus on the painting's conservation and students will have an opportunity to participate in the treatment procedures. Two before-treatment details are pictured below as well as treatment images. I would like to personally thank Mr. Peter Schoenmann, Ms. Elizabeth Kendall and their staff from Parma Conservation in Chicago for their donated services in the painting's treatment.
           

Dorothy Loeb "A Study in Primitive Forge" 1909
H. 78" X W. 200" Detail Before Treatment

Dorothy Loeb "A Study in Primitive Forge" 1909
H. 78" X W. 200" Detail Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning

           

After Treatment

           
           


           
117. Louis H. Sharp (1874-1946) was born in Glencoe, Illinois on July 27, 1874. He studied with Chase, Duveneck, Charles Boutwood, and at the Art Institute of Chicago. He sketched for a brief time on the Hopi reservation in Arizona before moving to Pasadena, California in 1914. For the next 15 years he kept studios both in Pasadena and Taos, New Mexico. In 1917 he spent many months painting in the Grand Canyon; in 1925 he was in Carmel on the Monterey peninsula, and after 1929 lived for a time in the Austrian Tyrol. Sharp died in Pasadena on June 13, 1946. This oil is owned by the Historical Society of Oak Park & River Forest, Oak Park, Illinois.

Louis H. Sharp "Point Lobos, California" ca. 1920
H. 25" X W. 30" Before Treatment
           

During cleaning

After Treatment
           
           


           
118. The lower "Portrait of James Taylor Lewis" (1819-1904) was painted by by William Cogswell (1819-1903). The painting is signed and dated 1862. Lewis was a lawyer, politician, and governor of Wisconsin. He enjoyed an early successful law practice and climbed the political ladder at a steady pace. As a Democrat, he was a member of the constitutional convention of 1847-1848, served in the Assembly (1852), the state Senate (1853), and as lieutenant governor from 1854 to 1856. He then retired to his law practice, but entered into politics again in 1861, this time as a Republican, and was elected secretary of state. In the gubernatorial election of 1863, the Republicans nominated Lewis. The Democratic opponent, Henry L. Palmer, had been tainted in some railroad deals of the previous decade and Lewis won the election. Lewis was a an ardent supporter of President Lincoln and faithfully supplied his state's quota of soldiers for the army. He was also instrumental in founding homes both for soldiers and soldiers' orphans. Keeping his 1863 election promise, he refused to run for a second term. This fact becomes all the more interesting, for it allowed an opening for the position that was subsequently filled by General Lucius Fairchild. Fairchild's portrait by John Singer Sargent is featured in a Case Study on Page 24.
           
The English-born artists Samuel Marsden Brookes and Thomas H. Stevenson moved to America and met in Chicago. In 1855, the pair opened a studio in Milwaukee and worked together on portrait and landscape oils. Collaboration on paintings is unusual but each brought an artistic strength. Brookes excelled as a portraitist and Stevenson as a landscapist. The lower right image is inscribed on the lining verso, "View of Madison. Brookes and Stevenson." Both paintings, as well as the Sargent, are owned by the Wisconsin Historical Society, Madison., Wisconsin.
           

William Cogswell "Portrait of James Taylor Lewis"
H. 30" X 25" Before Treatment

Samuel Marsden Brookes and Thomas H. Stevenson
"View of Madison" H. 31" X W. 37" Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning

           

After Treatment

After Treatment

           
           


           
           

Jacques Emile Edouard Brandon
"Interior Portuguese Synagogue in Amsterdam"
ca. 1867   H. 18" X W. 35
1/2" Before Treatment

119. Jacques Emile Edouard Brandon (1831-1897) was interested in capturing an aspect of Jewish life. Brandon was fully ensconced in the French art world, closely associating with and influenced by such famous artists as Camille Corot and Edgar Degas. Indeed, Brandon exhibited at the very first and very controversial Impressionist exhibition of 1874 (La Salon des Refusée). Brandon began his career painting Christian scenes before turning by the late 1860s to Jewish subject matter. Living in the "golden age" of synagogues, a phrase that refers to the building of some 250 elaborate synagogues throughout France during the nineteenth century, Brandon was fascinated with the architectonic and aesthetic power of the synagogue. Brandon's imposing scenes illustrate the synagogue's physical centrality to Jewish life. Brandon was the first Jewish artist to consider the synagogue not just as a place of religious prayer and meditation but also as a temple of aesthetic worship and experience. (Bio from www.24hourscholar) The represented painting is owned by the The Spertus Museum of Judaica. Chicago, Illinois. Layers of dirt and discolored varnish have veiled the painting's intended colorful palette. Cleaning will offer a dramatic change.
           

During Cleaning

After Treatment

           
           


           
120. Russian icons have been used for anagogical purposes for church prayer and personal use. With these understandings, the conservator is often more conservative with respect to their treatment. The fact that they were carried and transported as necessary certainly led to inadvertent damage. But this type of damage becomes part of the character of each piece. The two images below represent just such a discrepancy where one image is preserved to the edges while the other shows more typical damage from constant handling and use.
           

19th-Century Russian Icon
H. 23" X 17"

17th-Century Russian Icon
H. 9" X W. 11"

           
As an artist, the Neapolitan Salvatore Postiglione (1861-1906) would well have understood the hours required for training with only an indefinite possibility of future success. An image of artistic study will always carry an autobiographical touch. The wonderful composition on the left brings the viewer into the scene as if we are musical voyeurs participating in a solemn moment. The awkward unfamiliar hand position is cleverly presented. The right image, "Death of a Saint" has similar abilities to include the viewer. A space has been opened compositionally for just this purpose. All four paintings are owned by the Flint Institute of Arts, Flint, Michigan.
           

Salvatore Postiglione "Girl With a Violin"
H. 36" X w. 44" Before Treatment

Anonymous "Death of a Saint"
H. 9" X W. 11" Before Treatment

           

During Cleaning

During Cleaning
           

After Treatment

After Treatment
           
           


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Barry Bauman Conservation
Contact: Mr. Barry Bauman
1122 N. Jackson Ave., River Forest, IL. 60305
Ph.(708)771-0382  Fax.(708)771-1532
e-mail:barrybbc7@yahoo.com