2016
Participating Institutions
 
 
736. The right image is a portrait of Pocahontas and was executed by Robert Sully (1803-1855), the nephew of the great Thomas Sully. In 1854, Thomas Sully introduced Robert to Lyman Draper, and a lengthy written correspondence flourished. Draper envisioned a state art gallery within a Society in Madison to house the portraits of Wisconsin governors, Indian chiefs, senators, representatives, and early settlers, thus creating a visual record of the formation of early Wisconsin. In 1854, Draper asked many artists to send images of their paintings in exchange for honorary membership in the Society. This is precisely how the Society acquired the George Washington portrait.

Robert Sully replied to Draper's request by suggesting a painting tour of Wisconsin, proposing to paint the Black Hawk War battle grounds as historical documents. Draper answered by asking Sully to become the full-time Wisconsin State Historical Society artist. By promising official portraits to Wisconsin citizens, Draper raised enough money to bring Sully to Madison. On his 1855 trip to Madison, though, he unexpectedly died in Buffalo, New York. However, as a result of Sully's interest, the Society possesses a number of his works, including this Pocahontas image.





Tollman "Louis Dousman"
H. 26" x W. 22" Before Treatment


Robert Sully "Pocahontas"
H. 30" x W. 25" Before Treatment



During Cleaning


During Cleaning








After Treatment


After Treatment













           
737. Byron Burford (1920- 2011) was born in Mississippi but adopted the Midwest as his home after attending college at the University of Iowa. After graduation, he accepted an invitation from department chairman Grant Wood to join the faculty, where he became head of Painting. Burford paints with a realist style that often places his subjects in their defining context: circus performers at work or jazz musicians with their instruments. His work is in the collections of the Nelson-Atkins Museum, the Walker Art Center, and the University of Iowa Museum of Art. This oil is owned by Culver Academies, Culver, Indiana.

Byron Burford "Dark Landscape"
H. 45" x W. 42" After Treatment













738. These oils represent 109 paintings that have been conserved for the Indiana State Museum over the last eleven years. The paintings are from the hand of T. C. Steele, the leading artist of the Hoosier School of Midwestern Impressionists. Steele was born in 1847 and died in 1926. During his formative years he moved to Munich and studied at the Royal Academy of Art with Frank Duveneck and Ludwig Loefftz. In 1885 he returned to Indianapolis and established an art school with William Forsyth. While his landscapes are his signature style, he was also a very fine portrait artist. Today he is remembered as Indiana's finest artist from the early part of the 20th century.



T. C. Steele "Brookville"
H.22" x W. 32" Before Treatment


T. C. Steele "Flowers"
H. 36" x W. 29" Before Treatment








During Cleaning


During Cleaning








After Treatment


After Treatment



















739. Maurice Braun (18771941) was an American artist who became known for Impressionist landscapes of southern California. He was born in Hungary but by the age of four his family immigrated to New York City. He first studied at the National Academy of Fine Arts where he studied the French traditions and in 1901 he trained under William Merritt Chase. In 1909 he left for California. Maurice Braun died in San Diego on November 7, 1941. This work is owned by Georgetown College, Georgetown, Kentucky.


Maurice Braun "Spring in California"
H. 14" x W. 18" Before Treatment



During Cleaning


After Treatment













740. Paul Sawyier (1865-1917) was one of Kentucky's most renowned artists. He was born in Ohio but in 1870 he moved with his family to Frankfort, Kentucky. After high school, Sawyier studied under Frank Duveneck and, in 1889, he furthered his art education under William Merritt Chase at the Art Students League of New York. Sawyier is noted for his paintings of Kentucky. In 1893, some of his works were in the State of Kentucky display at the Columbian Exposition in Chicago. At the time of his death it is estimated that he painted 3,000 works of art. The below oils are from the fine collection at the University of Kentucky Museum of Art.








P. Sawyier "Mr. Graham"
H. 22" x W. 16" Before


S. Goff "Surf and Stones"
H. 25" x W. 31" Before

Anon. "Landscape"
H. 18" x W. 14" Before




During Cleaning


During Cleaning


During Cleaning








After Treatment


After Treatment


After Treatment





Home, Page 149, 150, 151

 





Barry Bauman Conservation
Contact: Mr. Barry Bauman
1122 N. Jackson Ave., River Forest, IL. 60305
Ph.(708)771-0382  Fax.(708)771-1532
e-mail:barrybbc7@yahoo.com