2013
Participating Institutions
 
 
531. A lifelong resident of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, Marvin Cone was a leader in regionalist art and the Linn County art community. He completed his undergraduate education at Coe College (1914) and then enrolled at the Art Institute of Chicago and the Ecole des Beaux Arts, Montpellier. Together, Cone and Grant Wood developed and launched the Stone City Art Colony in the summer of 1932. In 1933, Cone accepted a painting professor position at Coe College and continued to teach at Coe until 1960. Marvin Cone died in Cedar Rapids in 1965. The imaged painting is owned by Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa.

Marvin Cone "Dreaded Areas"
H. 24" x W. 30" Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

After Treatment
           
           


           
532. Ralph Clarkson is one of Chicago's most important portrait artists. Clarkson was born in 1861 in Massachusetts. He studied art in Boston and with the renown Lefebvre in Paris. He eventually came to Chicago in 1896 and became an instructor and governing member of the Art Institute. In 1898, he was a founding member of the Eagle's Nest Colony. The Colony acted as a summer retreat for a variety of artists including Lorado Taft and Hamlin Garland. The lease on the property lasted as long as one of the original founding members was alive. In 1942, the Colony ended upon the death of Ralph Clarkson. He is currently represented in the collections of the National Academy, New York , and the Art Institute of Chicago. This portrait is owned by Northern Illinois University, Dekalb, Illinois.

Ralph Clarkson "John Cook"
H. 36" x W. 30" Before Treatment
           

During Cleaning

After Treatment
           
           


           
533. Richard Lorenz (1858-1915) was recruited in Germany to come to America, and in the spring of 1886, he settled in Milwaukee where he was employed by William Wehner's American Panorama Company. He became the equestrian specialist and worked on the two versions of the Battle of Atlanta and Jerusalem on the Day of the Crucifixion that the company produced. In 1901, Lorenz was one of the founding members of the Society of Milwaukee Artists. He was the first vice-president of the group. In 1913, they changed their name to Wisconsin Painters & Sculptors. Lorenz was also a teacher, instructing many of Wisconsin's artists at the Wisconsin School of Design. He died in 1915. These three works are from the collection of the Museum of Wisconsin Art, West Bend, Wisconsin.
           

Lorenz "Purple Hills"
H. 10" x W. 16" Before

Lorenz "Western Scene"
H. 5" x W. 13" Before

Lorenz "Western Lds."
H. 12" x W. 19" Before
       
           


           
534. These oils represent 91 paintings that have been conserved for the Indiana State Museum over the last nine years. The left image is from the hand of T. C. Steele, the leading artist of the Hoosier School of Midwestern Impressionists. Steele was born in 1847 and died in 1926. During his formative years he moved to Munich and studied at the Royal Academy of Art with Frank Duveneck and Ludwig Loefftz. In 1885 he returned to Indianapolis and established an art school with William Forsyth. While his landscapes are his signature style, he was also a very fine portrait artist. Today he is remembered as Indiana's finest artist from the early part of the 20th century. The right image is hardly visible under the veiling darkened varnish. Cleaning will offer the intended palette.
           

T. C. Steele "Hollyhocks"
H. 29" x W. 22" Before

John Bundy "Summertime"
H. 14" x W. 20" Before

Jacob Cox "Genre Scene"
H. 10" x W. 8" Before
       

During Cleaning

During Cleaning

During Cleaning

           

After Treatment

After Treatment

After Treatment
           
           


           
535. Known for his mystical still-lifes, Hovsep Pushman (1877­1966) had a celebrated career. Born in Armenia, he received a scholarship to attend the Constantinople Academy of Art when he was only eleven years-old. From there, his career took him from the Art Institute of Chicago to China, where he acquired a deep-seated interest in Asian art. He eventually settled in New York, opening his studio in 1921. Inspired by his Eastern heritage, Pushman created still-life paintings of oriental objects-vases, idols, and tapestries-lit by a mysterious glow. Pushman exhibited at the Paris Salon, the National Academy of Design, and the Corcoran Gallery. His 1932 solo show at Grand Central Art Galleries sold out by the end of the first day. His work may now be found at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and the Butler Institute of American Art. This painting is owned by the Oshkosh Public Museum, Oshkosh, Wisconsin.

Hovsep Pushman "La Supreme Silence"
H. 19" x W. 15" Before Treatment
           

Duiring Cleaning

After Treatment
           
           


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Barry Bauman Conservation
Contact: Mr. Barry Bauman
1122 N. Jackson Ave., River Forest, IL. 60305
Ph.(708)771-0382  Fax.(708)771-1532
e-mail:barrybbc7@yahoo.com